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Alcohol and Mental Health

How Much Alcohol Is in Rum?

Published:
February 27, 2024
·
19 min read
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Written by
Reframe Content Team
A team of researchers and psychologists who specialize in behavioral health and neuroscience. This group collaborates to produce insightful and evidence-based content.
February 27, 2024
·
19 min read
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Certified recovery coach specialized in helping everyone redefine their relationship with alcohol. His approach in coaching focuses on habit formation and addressing the stress in our lives.
February 27, 2024
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19 min read
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Recognized by Fortune and Fast Company as a top innovator shaping the future of health and known for his pivotal role in helping individuals change their relationship with alcohol.
February 27, 2024
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19 min read
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Reframe Content Team
February 27, 2024
·
19 min read

Rum: A Look Inside the Bottle

  • Rum is made from fermented sugarcane and contains about 40% alcohol by volume (ABV), although it can range from 20% to over 75% based on the variety.
  • Those of us watching our nutrition and/or drinking habits should limit rum because of its high calorie and alcohol content.
  • Become more mindful of your alcohol consumption by using Reframe to track your alcohol intake, set daily goals, and learn about different types of alcohol.

How Much Alcohol Is in Rum?

In the first written account of rum, explorers who landed on the island of Nevis in 1651 describe it with a bit of trepidation: “The chief fuddling they make in the islands is Rumbullion, alias Kill-Divil, and is made of sugarcanes distilled, a hot, hellish, and terrible liquor.”

What makes it so “hot and hellish?” Let’s look closer at the alcohol content in rum and dig into the nutritional facts. Is rum good for you, or were those early explorers on to something when they gave it the side-eye? Let’s find out!

Rum Production

Alcohol glasses on a table

The production of any type of alcohol happens in two basic steps: fermentation and distillation. From there it goes to an optional third step (aging) before ending up in a bottle.

  1. Fermentation. The basic “recipe” for making alcohol calls for 3 ingredients: water, sugar, and yeast. Depending on the drink being made, the sugars come from different sources. For example, grapes make wine, barley makes beer, apples make cider, and so forth. Yeast eats the sugars, releasing carbon dioxide and alcohol — the biological process known as fermentation. Voila! We now have booze.

    While this seems simple enough, there are a few more details to consider. This process is anaerobic, which means it doesn’t require oxygen, but the temperature has to be just right — veer off by a few degrees, and the whole thing falls flat.
  2. Distillation. The liquid that we get from fermentation, however, isn’t the final product. First, it needs to be distilled. The liquid is heated, which causes the alcohol to evaporate and separate from the water in the mixture. Once the boozy vapor has cooled, it turns back into a highly concentrated liquid. The more times this process is repeated, the more pure and potent the final product ends up being.
  3. Aging. This step is less about science and more about patience (although there’s still a lot of chemistry involved). Many types of alcohol are stored in wooden containers that allow the chemicals to undergo various reactions with the wood and air. The result? A different flavor profile, often smoother and more complex.

Making Spirits Bright (and Different)

So if all spirits are made in a similar way, what makes them different? One of the main distinctions lies in the source of sugar used in fermentation. For example, tequila owes its characteristic flavor to the blue agave plant, whiskey is made from fermented grain mash, while vodka is usually made from wheat or rye, but can be produced using potatoes, grapes, or sugar beets.

Rum in particular is made from fermented sugarcane juice, sugarcane syrup, sugarcane molasses, and other sugarcane by-products. Sugarcane was first fermented in 350 BC in India, and rum was first distilled in the Caribbean on sugarcane plantations in the 17th century.

Today, rum production is mostly based in the Caribbean, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. However, Brazil is famous for its own unique variety made from fresh sugarcane juice, known as "Cachaça." While each region has its own signature touch, most rum falls into one of three categories.

Through the Ages of Rum

The aging process produces different varieties of rum: light, gold, and dark. Here’s a brief profile of each one:

  • Light rum. Also known as white or silver rum, light rum is usually aged for a shorter period compared to its darker counterparts. It's often aged in stainless steel tanks or for a very short time in wooden barrels. It ends up with a mild, slightly sweet taste, since it doesn’t have the chance to soak up as much of the barrel’s wood flavor.
  • Gold rum. Gold rum starts off similarly to light rum but gets its color and complexity from aging in wooden barrels. This process imparts flavors reminiscent of vanilla, almond, citrus, and caramel.
  • Dark rum. While the process of making dark rum is similar to the others, there’s an extra step involved, typically the addition of caramelized sugar or molasses for fermentation. As the name suggests, it’s the darkest in color and soaks in the barrels the longest. The result? A heavier, deeper, and more robust flavor.

Each type of rum is distinctly different in more than just color and flavor. So how does their alcohol content stack up?

ABV: The Rum Range

Rum alcohol content depends on the type (as well as on a few other factors). Before we get into all that, let’s review how alcohol content ends up being different across various types of drinks in the first place.

Alcohol content is a way to quantify the strength of an alcoholic beverage. It can be given in 2 forms: alcohol by volume (ABV) or “proof.”

As a distilled spirit, rum usually contains around 40% alcohol by volume (ABV), which is equivalent to 80 proof. This rule isn’t hard and fast; different types of rum can range from 20% to 75.5% ABV.

This wide range has to do with the details of its production, partially overlapping with the color and flavor profiles. However, there are a few extra nuances. 

  • Light rum is typically around 40% ABV, which is the standard for rum. Light rum is primarily used in cocktails, which warrants a balanced ABV that doesn’t overpower other ingredients.
  • Gold rum hovers around 40% ABV as well — a “sweet spot” that allows the richer flavor to come through without being too harsh.
  • Dark rum clocks in a bit higher, ranging from 40 to 50%. Some premium or overproof varieties can go even higher. 
  • Overproof rum is a heavy-hitting dark rum variety that contains at least 57.5% ABV, with some varieties reaching as much as 75.5% ABV, or 151 proof.
  • Flavored rums are infused with fruit flavors and usually contain about 40% ABV, or 80 proof.
  • Spiced rums are also around 40 % ABV. The focus here is on the infusion of spices and flavorings, and the lower ABV helps maintain a balanced profile.

These guidelines are general, but each rum producer has their own philosophy and approach. Let’s take a look at how major rums make their mark.

Alcohol Content in Different Brands of Rum

Alcohol Content in Different Brands of Rum

Here’s a breakdown of some of the most popular brands of rum:

  • Bacardi: 40% ABV
  • Captain Morgan: 40% ABV
  • Malibu: 20% ABV
  • Admiral Nelson: 35% ABV
  • Stroh: 80% ABV
  • Whaler’s: 30 to 40% ABV
  • Tommy Bahama: 40% ABV
  • Castillo: 40% ABV

Clearly, Malibu stands out among the rest and contains the least amount of alcohol by volume. Malibu is classified as a liqueur, which is why it has a lower alcohol content compared to standard rums. Liqueurs are usually lower in alcohol with added ingredients like sugars and flavoring.

So besides alcohol (and sometimes flavoring), what else is in that rum bottle?

Rum: The Nutritional Profile

Ever wondered how many calories are in rum? The answer depends on the amount of alcohol, but on average a shot of 40% ABV rum contains about 97 calories per 1.5 ounces (44 ml). That amount can skyrocket when it gets added to mixed drinks. Here’s what that can look like:

  • A Rum and Coke contains about 150-200 calories per serving.
  • A Piña Colada is traditionally made with light rum, coconut cream, and pineapple juice. These heavy ingredients will typically set us back by about 230-300 calories per serving, but can be higher depending on the brand of the mixers.
  • A Daiquiri clocks in at about 180-220 calories for a standard serving. Most of the calories come from the rum and the sugar in the fruit juice.
  • A Hurricane is made from light and dark rums, passion fruit juice, orange juice, lime juice, simple syrup, and grenadine. It’s about 250-320 calories per serving, depending on the amount of rum and the sweetness of the juices.
  • A Dark ‘n’ Stormy has roughly 180-240 calories per serving, mostly from the rum and the sugar in the ginger beer it’s made from.
  • One Mai Tai is around 260-330 calories due to the mixture of light and dark rums, lime juice, orange curaçao, orgeat syrup, and simple syrup.
  • A Long Island Iced Tea is made from vodka, tequila, light rum, triple sec, gin, a splash of cola, and lemon or lime juice. In spite of the innocuous-sounding name, it can set us back as much as 300-380 calories for a single serving!

And that’s not the whole story. There are many other reasons why rum is a nutritional flop:

  • Empty calories. Even without the mixers, the calories in rum are so-called “empty calories” that don’t do very much for us nutrition-wise. The body tends to process alcohol first, leaving calories from food to be stored as fat.
  • Sugar in mixers. While rum itself doesn't contain sugar after the distillation process, many rum-based beverages and cocktails utilize sugary mixers or added sweeteners, further increasing calorie count without nutritional benefits.
  • Lack of nutrients. Unlike foods that contribute to our daily nutrient requirements, rum doesn’t offer vitamins, minerals, fiber, or protein. It's just alcohol and water with trace amounts of other compounds that contribute to its flavor and aroma.

Is Rum Good for You?

For those watching their alcohol intake (or their weight and nutrition), rum is probably not the best choice. Here are some of the downsides of choosing rum:

  • Rum has a high alcohol content. There’s no denying it — like other spirits, rum has a high ABV that gets us intoxicated quickly. In the short term, alcohol affects cognitive processes and judgment, so we might make decisions that don’t line up with our true intentions. We might also wake up with a serious hangover the next morning.

    In the long term, excessive alcohol use wreaks havoc on our system, causing liver damage, cardiovascular problems, stomach issues, eight gain, and cognitive impairment. If we overdo it for a long time, our tolerance will start rising and dependence might creep in, raising the risk of developing alcohol use disorder (AUD).
  • Sugary drinks mask the flavor of alcohol. It can be easy to drink more than we intended if our rum-based mixed drink contains sugary syrups and juices that mask the flavor of booze. Plus, those calories really add up quickly!
  • Rum-based drink names make them sound safer than they are. Long Island Iced Tea in particular is notorious for misleading folks into thinking it’s lighter than it is — both in terms of ABV and calories.

All of this adds up to a pretty resounding conclusion: no, rum is not very good for you! While it’s still possible to enjoy rum once in a while, moderation is key — although ultimately, you’re probably better off without it.

Tips for Staying Safe

If you’re considering quitting or cutting back on rum (or alcohol in general), here are some tips to help you on your way:

  1. Reflect on your alcohol intake. Track your drinking for a while to see if any patterns emerge. Don’t judge — just approach the process with curiosity and excitement. You’re making an important change in your life, and that’s something to celebrate.
  2. Expand your support circle. Everything is easier with a tribe to support you, so find and expand yours! In addition to friends and family members, there are lots of online support communities (such as Reframe!) ready to cheer you on.
  3. Fill your life with meaning. Find alcohol-free activities you enjoy and pursue them. Whether it’s hiking, kickboxing, learning graphic design, planting a vegetable garden in your backyard, making your own pasta, or hosting a mocktail trivia night, there’s a whole world out there to explore.
  4. Ask for help. If you want to change your drinking habits but don’t know how, rest assured that there is a lot of help available out there — don’t hesitate to seek it out if you need to. From therapy targeted at alcohol misuse, to distinct methods like cognitive behavioral therapy or dialectical behavioral therapy, to online communities and mindfulness-based approaches, there are many paths to explore.

Summing Up

Rum has a strong presence in many cultures and has been around for generations, but it’s a good idea to be careful when drinking it. Remember, the flavor in many rum cocktails comes from the mixers, so non-alcoholic versions of the same cocktails are always an option! There’s always room for new traditions and new trends when it comes to enjoying tropical beverages. Furthermore, there is so much to discover when it comes to what we do for fun, ways in which we relax, and how we view different components of our lives — including alcohol.

How Much Alcohol Is in Rum?

In the first written account of rum, explorers who landed on the island of Nevis in 1651 describe it with a bit of trepidation: “The chief fuddling they make in the islands is Rumbullion, alias Kill-Divil, and is made of sugarcanes distilled, a hot, hellish, and terrible liquor.”

What makes it so “hot and hellish?” Let’s look closer at the alcohol content in rum and dig into the nutritional facts. Is rum good for you, or were those early explorers on to something when they gave it the side-eye? Let’s find out!

Rum Production

Alcohol glasses on a table

The production of any type of alcohol happens in two basic steps: fermentation and distillation. From there it goes to an optional third step (aging) before ending up in a bottle.

  1. Fermentation. The basic “recipe” for making alcohol calls for 3 ingredients: water, sugar, and yeast. Depending on the drink being made, the sugars come from different sources. For example, grapes make wine, barley makes beer, apples make cider, and so forth. Yeast eats the sugars, releasing carbon dioxide and alcohol — the biological process known as fermentation. Voila! We now have booze.

    While this seems simple enough, there are a few more details to consider. This process is anaerobic, which means it doesn’t require oxygen, but the temperature has to be just right — veer off by a few degrees, and the whole thing falls flat.
  2. Distillation. The liquid that we get from fermentation, however, isn’t the final product. First, it needs to be distilled. The liquid is heated, which causes the alcohol to evaporate and separate from the water in the mixture. Once the boozy vapor has cooled, it turns back into a highly concentrated liquid. The more times this process is repeated, the more pure and potent the final product ends up being.
  3. Aging. This step is less about science and more about patience (although there’s still a lot of chemistry involved). Many types of alcohol are stored in wooden containers that allow the chemicals to undergo various reactions with the wood and air. The result? A different flavor profile, often smoother and more complex.

Making Spirits Bright (and Different)

So if all spirits are made in a similar way, what makes them different? One of the main distinctions lies in the source of sugar used in fermentation. For example, tequila owes its characteristic flavor to the blue agave plant, whiskey is made from fermented grain mash, while vodka is usually made from wheat or rye, but can be produced using potatoes, grapes, or sugar beets.

Rum in particular is made from fermented sugarcane juice, sugarcane syrup, sugarcane molasses, and other sugarcane by-products. Sugarcane was first fermented in 350 BC in India, and rum was first distilled in the Caribbean on sugarcane plantations in the 17th century.

Today, rum production is mostly based in the Caribbean, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. However, Brazil is famous for its own unique variety made from fresh sugarcane juice, known as "Cachaça." While each region has its own signature touch, most rum falls into one of three categories.

Through the Ages of Rum

The aging process produces different varieties of rum: light, gold, and dark. Here’s a brief profile of each one:

  • Light rum. Also known as white or silver rum, light rum is usually aged for a shorter period compared to its darker counterparts. It's often aged in stainless steel tanks or for a very short time in wooden barrels. It ends up with a mild, slightly sweet taste, since it doesn’t have the chance to soak up as much of the barrel’s wood flavor.
  • Gold rum. Gold rum starts off similarly to light rum but gets its color and complexity from aging in wooden barrels. This process imparts flavors reminiscent of vanilla, almond, citrus, and caramel.
  • Dark rum. While the process of making dark rum is similar to the others, there’s an extra step involved, typically the addition of caramelized sugar or molasses for fermentation. As the name suggests, it’s the darkest in color and soaks in the barrels the longest. The result? A heavier, deeper, and more robust flavor.

Each type of rum is distinctly different in more than just color and flavor. So how does their alcohol content stack up?

ABV: The Rum Range

Rum alcohol content depends on the type (as well as on a few other factors). Before we get into all that, let’s review how alcohol content ends up being different across various types of drinks in the first place.

Alcohol content is a way to quantify the strength of an alcoholic beverage. It can be given in 2 forms: alcohol by volume (ABV) or “proof.”

As a distilled spirit, rum usually contains around 40% alcohol by volume (ABV), which is equivalent to 80 proof. This rule isn’t hard and fast; different types of rum can range from 20% to 75.5% ABV.

This wide range has to do with the details of its production, partially overlapping with the color and flavor profiles. However, there are a few extra nuances. 

  • Light rum is typically around 40% ABV, which is the standard for rum. Light rum is primarily used in cocktails, which warrants a balanced ABV that doesn’t overpower other ingredients.
  • Gold rum hovers around 40% ABV as well — a “sweet spot” that allows the richer flavor to come through without being too harsh.
  • Dark rum clocks in a bit higher, ranging from 40 to 50%. Some premium or overproof varieties can go even higher. 
  • Overproof rum is a heavy-hitting dark rum variety that contains at least 57.5% ABV, with some varieties reaching as much as 75.5% ABV, or 151 proof.
  • Flavored rums are infused with fruit flavors and usually contain about 40% ABV, or 80 proof.
  • Spiced rums are also around 40 % ABV. The focus here is on the infusion of spices and flavorings, and the lower ABV helps maintain a balanced profile.

These guidelines are general, but each rum producer has their own philosophy and approach. Let’s take a look at how major rums make their mark.

Alcohol Content in Different Brands of Rum

Alcohol Content in Different Brands of Rum

Here’s a breakdown of some of the most popular brands of rum:

  • Bacardi: 40% ABV
  • Captain Morgan: 40% ABV
  • Malibu: 20% ABV
  • Admiral Nelson: 35% ABV
  • Stroh: 80% ABV
  • Whaler’s: 30 to 40% ABV
  • Tommy Bahama: 40% ABV
  • Castillo: 40% ABV

Clearly, Malibu stands out among the rest and contains the least amount of alcohol by volume. Malibu is classified as a liqueur, which is why it has a lower alcohol content compared to standard rums. Liqueurs are usually lower in alcohol with added ingredients like sugars and flavoring.

So besides alcohol (and sometimes flavoring), what else is in that rum bottle?

Rum: The Nutritional Profile

Ever wondered how many calories are in rum? The answer depends on the amount of alcohol, but on average a shot of 40% ABV rum contains about 97 calories per 1.5 ounces (44 ml). That amount can skyrocket when it gets added to mixed drinks. Here’s what that can look like:

  • A Rum and Coke contains about 150-200 calories per serving.
  • A Piña Colada is traditionally made with light rum, coconut cream, and pineapple juice. These heavy ingredients will typically set us back by about 230-300 calories per serving, but can be higher depending on the brand of the mixers.
  • A Daiquiri clocks in at about 180-220 calories for a standard serving. Most of the calories come from the rum and the sugar in the fruit juice.
  • A Hurricane is made from light and dark rums, passion fruit juice, orange juice, lime juice, simple syrup, and grenadine. It’s about 250-320 calories per serving, depending on the amount of rum and the sweetness of the juices.
  • A Dark ‘n’ Stormy has roughly 180-240 calories per serving, mostly from the rum and the sugar in the ginger beer it’s made from.
  • One Mai Tai is around 260-330 calories due to the mixture of light and dark rums, lime juice, orange curaçao, orgeat syrup, and simple syrup.
  • A Long Island Iced Tea is made from vodka, tequila, light rum, triple sec, gin, a splash of cola, and lemon or lime juice. In spite of the innocuous-sounding name, it can set us back as much as 300-380 calories for a single serving!

And that’s not the whole story. There are many other reasons why rum is a nutritional flop:

  • Empty calories. Even without the mixers, the calories in rum are so-called “empty calories” that don’t do very much for us nutrition-wise. The body tends to process alcohol first, leaving calories from food to be stored as fat.
  • Sugar in mixers. While rum itself doesn't contain sugar after the distillation process, many rum-based beverages and cocktails utilize sugary mixers or added sweeteners, further increasing calorie count without nutritional benefits.
  • Lack of nutrients. Unlike foods that contribute to our daily nutrient requirements, rum doesn’t offer vitamins, minerals, fiber, or protein. It's just alcohol and water with trace amounts of other compounds that contribute to its flavor and aroma.

Is Rum Good for You?

For those watching their alcohol intake (or their weight and nutrition), rum is probably not the best choice. Here are some of the downsides of choosing rum:

  • Rum has a high alcohol content. There’s no denying it — like other spirits, rum has a high ABV that gets us intoxicated quickly. In the short term, alcohol affects cognitive processes and judgment, so we might make decisions that don’t line up with our true intentions. We might also wake up with a serious hangover the next morning.

    In the long term, excessive alcohol use wreaks havoc on our system, causing liver damage, cardiovascular problems, stomach issues, eight gain, and cognitive impairment. If we overdo it for a long time, our tolerance will start rising and dependence might creep in, raising the risk of developing alcohol use disorder (AUD).
  • Sugary drinks mask the flavor of alcohol. It can be easy to drink more than we intended if our rum-based mixed drink contains sugary syrups and juices that mask the flavor of booze. Plus, those calories really add up quickly!
  • Rum-based drink names make them sound safer than they are. Long Island Iced Tea in particular is notorious for misleading folks into thinking it’s lighter than it is — both in terms of ABV and calories.

All of this adds up to a pretty resounding conclusion: no, rum is not very good for you! While it’s still possible to enjoy rum once in a while, moderation is key — although ultimately, you’re probably better off without it.

Tips for Staying Safe

If you’re considering quitting or cutting back on rum (or alcohol in general), here are some tips to help you on your way:

  1. Reflect on your alcohol intake. Track your drinking for a while to see if any patterns emerge. Don’t judge — just approach the process with curiosity and excitement. You’re making an important change in your life, and that’s something to celebrate.
  2. Expand your support circle. Everything is easier with a tribe to support you, so find and expand yours! In addition to friends and family members, there are lots of online support communities (such as Reframe!) ready to cheer you on.
  3. Fill your life with meaning. Find alcohol-free activities you enjoy and pursue them. Whether it’s hiking, kickboxing, learning graphic design, planting a vegetable garden in your backyard, making your own pasta, or hosting a mocktail trivia night, there’s a whole world out there to explore.
  4. Ask for help. If you want to change your drinking habits but don’t know how, rest assured that there is a lot of help available out there — don’t hesitate to seek it out if you need to. From therapy targeted at alcohol misuse, to distinct methods like cognitive behavioral therapy or dialectical behavioral therapy, to online communities and mindfulness-based approaches, there are many paths to explore.

Summing Up

Rum has a strong presence in many cultures and has been around for generations, but it’s a good idea to be careful when drinking it. Remember, the flavor in many rum cocktails comes from the mixers, so non-alcoholic versions of the same cocktails are always an option! There’s always room for new traditions and new trends when it comes to enjoying tropical beverages. Furthermore, there is so much to discover when it comes to what we do for fun, ways in which we relax, and how we view different components of our lives — including alcohol.

Summary FAQs

1. What exactly is rum, and how is it made?

Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made primarily from sugarcane by-products like molasses or sugarcane juice. Rum production involves three key steps: fermentation, distillation, and sometimes aging. Fermentation is where yeast converts sugars into alcohol. Distillation then purifies and concentrates the alcohol. Aging, when used, enhances the flavor, making it smoother and more complex.

2. What makes different types of rum distinct from each other?

The type of rum — light, gold, or dark — largely depends on the aging process and ingredients. Light rum is aged for a shorter period, gold rum ages longer and gains its color and flavor from wooden barrels, and dark rum ages the longest and typically includes added ingredients like caramelized sugar or molasses.

3. What is the alcohol content in rum, and why does it vary?

Rum's alcohol content, measured as alcohol by volume (ABV), typically starts at around 40% but can range from 20% to 75.5%. This variation is due to different production methods. Light and flavored rums usually clock in at around 40% ABV, while overproof rums can reach up to 75.5% ABV.

4. Are there nutritional concerns associated with rum consumption?

With its "empty calories" and no significant nutritional value, rum isn’t a good nutritional choice. Plus, the calorie count increases significantly when mixed with sugary drinks. 

5. Is rum consumption potentially harmful to health?

The high ABV in rum can lead to rapid intoxication and poor decision-making in the short term. Excessive long-term consumption can cause liver damage, cardiovascular issues, and other health problems. Sugary rum cocktails can also mask the alcohol's strength, leading to overconsumption.

6. What are some tips for those looking to reduce their rum or alcohol intake?

To reduce alcohol intake, start by tracking your drinking habits to identify patterns. Seek support from friends, family, or online communities. Engage in meaningful, alcohol-free activities. If necessary, don't hesitate to seek professional help, including seeking therapy or joining support groups.

Ready To Change Your Relationship With Rum — and Alcohol in General? Reframe Can Help!

Although it isn’t a treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the Reframe app can help you cut back on drinking gradually with the science-backed knowledge to empower you 100% of the way. Our proven program has helped millions of people around the world drink less and live more. And we want to help you get there, too!

The Reframe app equips you with the knowledge and skills you need to not only survive drinking less, but to thrive while you navigate the journey. Our daily research-backed readings teach you the neuroscience of alcohol, and our in-app Toolkit provides the resources and activities you need to navigate each challenge.

You’ll meet millions of fellow Reframers in our 24/7 Forum chat and daily Zoom check-in meetings. Receive encouragement from people worldwide who know exactly what you’re going through! You’ll also have the opportunity to connect with our licensed Reframe coaches for more personalized guidance.

Plus, we’re always introducing new features to optimize your in-app experience. We recently launched our in-app chatbot, Melody, powered by the world’s most powerful AI technology. Melody is here to help as you adjust to a life with less (or no) alcohol. 

And that’s not all! Every month, we launch fun challenges, like Dry/Damp January, Mental Health May, and Outdoorsy June. You won’t want to miss out on the chance to participate alongside fellow Reframers (or solo if that’s more your thing!).

The Reframe app is free for 7 days, so you don’t have anything to lose by trying it. Are you ready to feel empowered and discover life beyond alcohol? Then download our app today!

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