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Alcohol and Health

How Much Drinking Causes Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Published:
July 4, 2023
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18 min read
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Reframe Content Team
A team of researchers and psychologists who specialize in behavioral health and neuroscience. This group collaborates to produce insightful and evidence-based content.
July 4, 2023
·
18 min read
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Certified recovery coach specialized in helping everyone redefine their relationship with alcohol. His approach in coaching focuses on habit formation and addressing the stress in our lives.
July 4, 2023
·
18 min read
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Recognized by Fortune and Fast Company as a top innovator shaping the future of health and known for his pivotal role in helping individuals change their relationship with alcohol.
July 4, 2023
·
18 min read
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Reframe Content Team
July 4, 2023
·
18 min read

Pregnancy is a wonderful, beautiful thing! But it also brings with it a variety of challenges. The hormonal mood swings, the cramping, the cravings, the swelling — not to mention the list of activities we can and can’t do, and the foods and drinks we should avoid.

Chances are we know that drinking alcohol during pregnancy can be dangerous. But how much alcohol is too much? Can we have an occasional sip? In this post, we’ll explore how drinking alcohol can cause fetal alcohol syndrome and whether it’s safe to drink any amount during pregnancy. Let’s dive in!

What Is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a type of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) that results from alcohol exposure during a mother’s pregnancy. It affects roughly 2-5% of the U.S. population.

Children born with FAS can have multiple issues, such as intellectual and learning disabilities, physical differences in growth and development, and neurobehavioral issues that cause social challenges.

How Much Drinking Causes Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Despite what we might hear, any amount of alcohol during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome: no safe amount can be consumed. However, research suggests that both binge drinking (defined as having four or more drinks on one occasion) and drinking regularly during pregnancy put a fetus at the greatest risk for FAS.

But even low to moderate amounts of alcohol can have adverse effects on the developing fetus’ brain and organs. In fact, one study found that children whose mother drank any amount of alcohol during pregnancy were more likely to have impulsiveness, difficulty paying attention, and a mental health diagnosis, such as separation anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder.

Other studies have shown that drinking one drink a day during pregnancy can lead to IQ scores reduced by as many as 7 points, or problems in academic achievement, such as reading, spelling, and arithmetic.

What About Drinking Alcohol During the Second and Third Trimester?

Drinking during the first trimester — when we often don’t even know we’re pregnant — can have a particularly dramatic impact on fetal development. This is when the baby’s brain is undergoing tremendous growth and development.

However, drinking during the second and third trimesters can still greatly affect the fetus, since the brain and other organs continue to develop throughout pregnancy.

Keep in mind that alcohol can affect fetal development differently from person to person and pregnancy to pregnancy. For instance, even if a person drank some alcohol during a previous pregnancy and had a healthy baby, it doesn’t mean future pregnancies will have the same outcome.

How Does Alcohol Interfere With Fetal Development?

One reason alcohol is dangerous during pregnancy is that it’s passed through our bloodstream to the fetus via the umbilical cord. Fetuses don’t metabolize alcohol in the same way we do, so it stays in their body for a longer period of time. This can interfere with normal development. More specifically, alcohol can harm the fetus in these ways:

  • Interfere with nerve cells: Alcohol can interfere with the way nerve cells develop in the fetus and how they travel to and from different parts of the brain.
  • Kill cells: Alcohol can kill cells in different parts of the fetus, causing abnormal physical development.
  • Constrict blood vessels: Alcohol constricts blood vessels, which slows blood flow to the placenta — the baby’s food supply while in the uterus. This can cause a shortage of oxygen and nutrients to the fetus. One research study noted that after 1-2 glasses of wine, fetal breathing is almost completely suppressed, a sign of fetal distress.

What Are the Symptoms of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)?

The severity of FAS symptoms varies, with some children experiencing them to a far greater degree than others. Here’s a closer look at the effects of FAS:

  • Physical effects: People with FAS typically have distinctive facial features, including small eyes, an exceptionally thin upper lip, a short, upturned nose. They also might have deformities of joints, limb and fingers; slow physical growth before and after birth; a small head circumference and brain size; vision difficulties or hearing problems; heart defects; and problems with kidneys and bones.
  • Brain and central nervous system effects: People with FAS might have poor coordination or balance; learning disorders; poor memory; trouble with attention and processing information; poor judgment skills; difficulty with reasoning and problem solving; jitteriness or hyperactivity; and rapidly changing moods.
  • Social and behavioral effects: People with FAS might have trouble functioning, coping, and interacting with others. This might lead to difficulty in school, trouble getting along with others, poor social skills, problems with impulse control, problems staying on task, a poor concept of time, and difficulty working toward a goal.

While there is no medical test (like a blood test) to diagnose FAS, doctors typically make a diagnosis by looking at the child’s signs and symptoms.

Other Factors Increasing Risk of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Research indicates that certain environmental factors can increase the risk of a fetus developing fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetuses may be more affected by prenatal alcohol exposure if their mothers fall into any of these categories:

  • Have poor nutrition
  • Have had multiple pregnancies and births
  • Have lower-than-average weight, height, and body mass index (BMI)
  • Smoke
  • Are older
  • Don’t have access to proper prenatal care
  • Come from a family of people who drink heavily

Research also suggests that children can be more affected by prenatal alcohol exposure if their mothers experience adverse living conditions and high levels of stress.

Should We Drink Alcohol If We’re Trying To Become Pregnant?

If we’re trying to become pregnant, experts recommend avoiding alcohol entirely. This is because alcohol can cause damage to the fetus at any point during pregnancy — even before we know we’re pregnant.

One study found that mothers who drink more than 5 drinks in a single day before finding out they’re pregnant have an increased risk their child will be 1-3 months behind their peers in reading and math at the end of 1st grade.

Furthermore, alcohol is linked to fertility problems in both men and women. If we drink a lot and often, we may find it more difficult to get pregnant.

Are There Other Risks of Drinking Alcohol During Pregnancy?

In addition to increasing the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome, drinking alcohol during pregnancy can also increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, premature labor, and sudden infant death syndrome. The more we drink, the greater the risks.

One study noted that each week a woman drinks alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage. Another study found a 40% increase in likelihood of stillbirth for women who consumed any amount of alcohol compared with those who didn’t consume any alcohol.

What Is the Treatment for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for FAS, and the damage to the child’s brain and organs can’t be reversed. However, an early diagnosis and support can help manage symptoms. For instance, a doctor might prescribe medication to help with attention and behavior issues or recommend behavior and education therapy for emotional and learning concerns.

Parental training programs can help parents and families cope with any behavioral, educational, and social challenges.

Caring for Children With Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Certain “protective factors” can help reduce the effects of fetal alcohol syndrome and help those with FAS reach their full potential:

  • Being diagnosed before 6 years of age
  • A loving, nurturing, and stable home environment during the school years
  • Absence of violence around them
  • Involvement in special education and social services

Often, growing up in a stable, loving, and nurturing home can help children with FAS avoid developing mental and emotional difficulties as they get older. There are also several practical things we can do to help a child with fetal alcohol syndrome:

  • Enlist a family member to assist with caregiving
  • Block out disruptive noises when putting your baby to sleep
  • Feed your baby in a relatively quiet space
  • Ensure a predictable daily routine
  • Engage your baby in fun activities at home, such as reading books out loud or playing games
  • Talk to your child with simple words and ask them to repeat words back to you
  • If you’re taking your child to a new place, talk to them about where you’re going and what they can expect
  • Use rewards to reinforce acceptable behavior

What Should We Drink During Pregnancy?

So what are some of the healthiest things to drink during pregnancy? Here are some of the best drinks to keep you and your baby safe and healthy:

  • Water: We know, it sounds boring! But water should be your go-to beverage during pregnancy. Water helps our body absorb important nutrients that we’re getting from prenatal vitamins or our baby-friendly diet. Aim to get at least six to eight 8-ounce glasses per day. Remember: you’re not just trying to keep yourself hydrated, but your baby, too. Plus, water can help reduce or prevent cramps, constipating, fatigue, and urinary tract infections (UTIs).
  • Flavored water: Ok, so you’re sick of regular water! Try adding a little flavor to your H20, which might make it easier to consume. For instance, mint, berries, cucumber, watermelon, and citrus (lemon, lime, oranges) offer particularly refreshing tastes. Plus, the scent and flavor of lemons can ease nausea symptoms.
  • Milk: Milk, full of calcium and protein, is another healthy option, particularly toward the end of pregnancy when our baby’s bones are forming. Try to ensure the milk you’re drinking is pasteurized, as the pasteurization process kills off harmful bacteria like Listeria and E. Coli. If you’re worried about fat, opt for skim or low-fat milk. If you’re lactose intolerant, try non-dairy alternatives that are fortified with calcium.
  • Herbal tea: Regular tea, such as green tea, black tea, or oolong tea, contains caffeine, which we should avoid while pregnant. Herbal teas, however, don’t contain caffeine and are safe to consume. Ginger, lemon balm, and peppermint teas have been known to lessen morning sickness symptoms, and raspberry fruit teas can give us an antioxidant boost. (Save raspberry leaf tea till much later in pregnancy, since it is thought to hasten labor.)
  • Fruit and veggie smoothies: Blended fruits and veggies are a great way to meet your daily produce needs and stay hydrated at the same time. Keep added sugar low by sticking with liquids such as water, milk, or plain yogurt instead of juice. Also be sure to keep an eye out for added sodium in premixed veggie drinks. To make your smoothie even more satisfying, try adding a source of healthy fat, such as peanut butter, almond butter, or avocado.

The Bottom Line

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is entirely preventable by choosing not to drink alcohol while we’re pregnant. Consuming alcohol — even small amounts — at any point during pregnancy can be harmful. If you’re pregnant and drinking alcohol, it’s important to contact a medical professional right away. Stopping alcohol consumption at any point is better than not stopping at all.

If you’re experiencing difficulty eliminating alcohol from our life, consider trying Reframe. We can help empower you to cut back on drinking gradually, allowing you to live a healthier, happier life.

Pregnancy is a wonderful, beautiful thing! But it also brings with it a variety of challenges. The hormonal mood swings, the cramping, the cravings, the swelling — not to mention the list of activities we can and can’t do, and the foods and drinks we should avoid.

Chances are we know that drinking alcohol during pregnancy can be dangerous. But how much alcohol is too much? Can we have an occasional sip? In this post, we’ll explore how drinking alcohol can cause fetal alcohol syndrome and whether it’s safe to drink any amount during pregnancy. Let’s dive in!

What Is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a type of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) that results from alcohol exposure during a mother’s pregnancy. It affects roughly 2-5% of the U.S. population.

Children born with FAS can have multiple issues, such as intellectual and learning disabilities, physical differences in growth and development, and neurobehavioral issues that cause social challenges.

How Much Drinking Causes Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Despite what we might hear, any amount of alcohol during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome: no safe amount can be consumed. However, research suggests that both binge drinking (defined as having four or more drinks on one occasion) and drinking regularly during pregnancy put a fetus at the greatest risk for FAS.

But even low to moderate amounts of alcohol can have adverse effects on the developing fetus’ brain and organs. In fact, one study found that children whose mother drank any amount of alcohol during pregnancy were more likely to have impulsiveness, difficulty paying attention, and a mental health diagnosis, such as separation anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder.

Other studies have shown that drinking one drink a day during pregnancy can lead to IQ scores reduced by as many as 7 points, or problems in academic achievement, such as reading, spelling, and arithmetic.

What About Drinking Alcohol During the Second and Third Trimester?

Drinking during the first trimester — when we often don’t even know we’re pregnant — can have a particularly dramatic impact on fetal development. This is when the baby’s brain is undergoing tremendous growth and development.

However, drinking during the second and third trimesters can still greatly affect the fetus, since the brain and other organs continue to develop throughout pregnancy.

Keep in mind that alcohol can affect fetal development differently from person to person and pregnancy to pregnancy. For instance, even if a person drank some alcohol during a previous pregnancy and had a healthy baby, it doesn’t mean future pregnancies will have the same outcome.

How Does Alcohol Interfere With Fetal Development?

One reason alcohol is dangerous during pregnancy is that it’s passed through our bloodstream to the fetus via the umbilical cord. Fetuses don’t metabolize alcohol in the same way we do, so it stays in their body for a longer period of time. This can interfere with normal development. More specifically, alcohol can harm the fetus in these ways:

  • Interfere with nerve cells: Alcohol can interfere with the way nerve cells develop in the fetus and how they travel to and from different parts of the brain.
  • Kill cells: Alcohol can kill cells in different parts of the fetus, causing abnormal physical development.
  • Constrict blood vessels: Alcohol constricts blood vessels, which slows blood flow to the placenta — the baby’s food supply while in the uterus. This can cause a shortage of oxygen and nutrients to the fetus. One research study noted that after 1-2 glasses of wine, fetal breathing is almost completely suppressed, a sign of fetal distress.

What Are the Symptoms of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)?

The severity of FAS symptoms varies, with some children experiencing them to a far greater degree than others. Here’s a closer look at the effects of FAS:

  • Physical effects: People with FAS typically have distinctive facial features, including small eyes, an exceptionally thin upper lip, a short, upturned nose. They also might have deformities of joints, limb and fingers; slow physical growth before and after birth; a small head circumference and brain size; vision difficulties or hearing problems; heart defects; and problems with kidneys and bones.
  • Brain and central nervous system effects: People with FAS might have poor coordination or balance; learning disorders; poor memory; trouble with attention and processing information; poor judgment skills; difficulty with reasoning and problem solving; jitteriness or hyperactivity; and rapidly changing moods.
  • Social and behavioral effects: People with FAS might have trouble functioning, coping, and interacting with others. This might lead to difficulty in school, trouble getting along with others, poor social skills, problems with impulse control, problems staying on task, a poor concept of time, and difficulty working toward a goal.

While there is no medical test (like a blood test) to diagnose FAS, doctors typically make a diagnosis by looking at the child’s signs and symptoms.

Other Factors Increasing Risk of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Research indicates that certain environmental factors can increase the risk of a fetus developing fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetuses may be more affected by prenatal alcohol exposure if their mothers fall into any of these categories:

  • Have poor nutrition
  • Have had multiple pregnancies and births
  • Have lower-than-average weight, height, and body mass index (BMI)
  • Smoke
  • Are older
  • Don’t have access to proper prenatal care
  • Come from a family of people who drink heavily

Research also suggests that children can be more affected by prenatal alcohol exposure if their mothers experience adverse living conditions and high levels of stress.

Should We Drink Alcohol If We’re Trying To Become Pregnant?

If we’re trying to become pregnant, experts recommend avoiding alcohol entirely. This is because alcohol can cause damage to the fetus at any point during pregnancy — even before we know we’re pregnant.

One study found that mothers who drink more than 5 drinks in a single day before finding out they’re pregnant have an increased risk their child will be 1-3 months behind their peers in reading and math at the end of 1st grade.

Furthermore, alcohol is linked to fertility problems in both men and women. If we drink a lot and often, we may find it more difficult to get pregnant.

Are There Other Risks of Drinking Alcohol During Pregnancy?

In addition to increasing the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome, drinking alcohol during pregnancy can also increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, premature labor, and sudden infant death syndrome. The more we drink, the greater the risks.

One study noted that each week a woman drinks alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage. Another study found a 40% increase in likelihood of stillbirth for women who consumed any amount of alcohol compared with those who didn’t consume any alcohol.

What Is the Treatment for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for FAS, and the damage to the child’s brain and organs can’t be reversed. However, an early diagnosis and support can help manage symptoms. For instance, a doctor might prescribe medication to help with attention and behavior issues or recommend behavior and education therapy for emotional and learning concerns.

Parental training programs can help parents and families cope with any behavioral, educational, and social challenges.

Caring for Children With Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Certain “protective factors” can help reduce the effects of fetal alcohol syndrome and help those with FAS reach their full potential:

  • Being diagnosed before 6 years of age
  • A loving, nurturing, and stable home environment during the school years
  • Absence of violence around them
  • Involvement in special education and social services

Often, growing up in a stable, loving, and nurturing home can help children with FAS avoid developing mental and emotional difficulties as they get older. There are also several practical things we can do to help a child with fetal alcohol syndrome:

  • Enlist a family member to assist with caregiving
  • Block out disruptive noises when putting your baby to sleep
  • Feed your baby in a relatively quiet space
  • Ensure a predictable daily routine
  • Engage your baby in fun activities at home, such as reading books out loud or playing games
  • Talk to your child with simple words and ask them to repeat words back to you
  • If you’re taking your child to a new place, talk to them about where you’re going and what they can expect
  • Use rewards to reinforce acceptable behavior

What Should We Drink During Pregnancy?

So what are some of the healthiest things to drink during pregnancy? Here are some of the best drinks to keep you and your baby safe and healthy:

  • Water: We know, it sounds boring! But water should be your go-to beverage during pregnancy. Water helps our body absorb important nutrients that we’re getting from prenatal vitamins or our baby-friendly diet. Aim to get at least six to eight 8-ounce glasses per day. Remember: you’re not just trying to keep yourself hydrated, but your baby, too. Plus, water can help reduce or prevent cramps, constipating, fatigue, and urinary tract infections (UTIs).
  • Flavored water: Ok, so you’re sick of regular water! Try adding a little flavor to your H20, which might make it easier to consume. For instance, mint, berries, cucumber, watermelon, and citrus (lemon, lime, oranges) offer particularly refreshing tastes. Plus, the scent and flavor of lemons can ease nausea symptoms.
  • Milk: Milk, full of calcium and protein, is another healthy option, particularly toward the end of pregnancy when our baby’s bones are forming. Try to ensure the milk you’re drinking is pasteurized, as the pasteurization process kills off harmful bacteria like Listeria and E. Coli. If you’re worried about fat, opt for skim or low-fat milk. If you’re lactose intolerant, try non-dairy alternatives that are fortified with calcium.
  • Herbal tea: Regular tea, such as green tea, black tea, or oolong tea, contains caffeine, which we should avoid while pregnant. Herbal teas, however, don’t contain caffeine and are safe to consume. Ginger, lemon balm, and peppermint teas have been known to lessen morning sickness symptoms, and raspberry fruit teas can give us an antioxidant boost. (Save raspberry leaf tea till much later in pregnancy, since it is thought to hasten labor.)
  • Fruit and veggie smoothies: Blended fruits and veggies are a great way to meet your daily produce needs and stay hydrated at the same time. Keep added sugar low by sticking with liquids such as water, milk, or plain yogurt instead of juice. Also be sure to keep an eye out for added sodium in premixed veggie drinks. To make your smoothie even more satisfying, try adding a source of healthy fat, such as peanut butter, almond butter, or avocado.

The Bottom Line

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is entirely preventable by choosing not to drink alcohol while we’re pregnant. Consuming alcohol — even small amounts — at any point during pregnancy can be harmful. If you’re pregnant and drinking alcohol, it’s important to contact a medical professional right away. Stopping alcohol consumption at any point is better than not stopping at all.

If you’re experiencing difficulty eliminating alcohol from our life, consider trying Reframe. We can help empower you to cut back on drinking gradually, allowing you to live a healthier, happier life.

Summary FAQs

1. What is fetal alcohol syndrome?

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a type of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) that results from alcohol exposure during a mother’s pregnancy. Children born with FAS can have multiple issues, such as intellectual and learning disabilities, physical differences in growth and development, and neurobehavioral issues that cause social challenges.

2. How much drinking causes fetal alcohol syndrome?

Any amount of alcohol during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome: there’s no safe amount that can be consumed.Can I consume alcohol at any point during pregnancy?Drinking alcohol at any point in pregnancy — including the first, second, and third semesters — can be harmful and affect the growth and development of your baby.

3. What are the symptoms of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS?)

Symptoms vary and can include a range of physical, social, and behavioral problems. Some of the more common symptoms include abnormal facial features, such as a smooth ridge between the nose and upper lip; small head size; shorter than average height; low body weight; hyperactive behavior; learning disabilities in school; speech and language delays; and poor reasoning and judgment skills.

4. What is treatment for fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)?

There is no cure for fetal alcohol syndrome, as the damage to the child’s brain and organs can’t be reversed. However, an early diagnosis and support can help manage symptoms.

5. What are some of the healthiest things to drink during pregnancy?

Some of the best things to drink while pregnant include water, milk, herbal teas, and fruit and vegetable smoothies.

6. What are the symptoms of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS?)

Symptoms vary and can include a range of physical, social, and behavioral problems. Some of the more common symptoms include abnormal facial features, such as a smooth ridge between the nose and upper lip; small head size; shorter than average height; low body weight; hyperactive behavior; learning disabilities in school; speech and language delays; and poor reasoning and judgment skills.

7. What is treatment for fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)?

There is no cure for fetal alcohol syndrome, as the damage to the child’s brain and organs can’t be reversed. However, an early diagnosis and support can help manage symptoms.

8. What are some of the healthiest things to drink during pregnancy?

Some of the best things to drink while pregnant include water, milk, herbal teas, and fruit and vegetable smoothies.

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