Curious How Mindful Drinking Can Help You Thrive? 🎉🙌
Click Here
details womans sunburn skin from beach sun
Alcohol and Health

Margarita Burn: The Dangers of Mixing Lime Juice and Sun Exposure

Published:
August 6, 2023
·
7 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Written by
Reframe Content Team
A team of researchers and psychologists who specialize in behavioral health and neuroscience. This group collaborates to produce insightful and evidence-based content.
August 6, 2023
·
7 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Certified recovery coach specialized in helping everyone redefine their relationship with alcohol. His approach in coaching focuses on habit formation and addressing the stress in our lives.
August 6, 2023
·
7 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Recognized by Fortune and Fast Company as a top innovator shaping the future of health and known for his pivotal role in helping individuals change their relationship with alcohol.
August 6, 2023
·
7 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Reframe Content Team
August 6, 2023
·
7 min read

It’s a serene and picturesque summer day. You're comfortably lounging on the patio, savoring a chilled margarita in the sun's warm embrace. Your friend is slicing up limes and squeezing their tangy juice into your cocktail. You enjoy your drink and soak up as much sun as you can before heading back inside. A few days later, however, you're contending with a mysterious, painful sunburn. This isn’t just any sunburn — it’s the infamous “margarita burn.” Also referred to as lime burn or citrus burn, this condition tends to be triggered by eating citrus in the sun.

Demystifying the Margarita Burn

details womans sunburn skin from beach sun

Though the term “margarita burn” may sound playful, the reality is far from it. Rather than a true “burn,” it’s actually more of a margarita rash or margarita dermatitis. The formal name for this condition is phytophotodermatitis, an intense form of sunburn that can be incredibly painful. To break down the term, “phyto” stands for plant, “photo” signifies light or sun, and “dermatitis” points to a skin rash. It's a severe skin reaction to the sun after photosensitising chemicals (furanocoumarins), found in plant sap and fruits, make contact with the body. Phytophotodermatitis looks like blisters that can be confused with sun poisoning or a common rash.

Furocoumarins can increase the skin's sensitivity to the sun, escalating the effects of a sunburn. Interestingly, a variant of phytophotodermatitis, dubbed “berloque dermatitis,” was common in the 1920s among people who wore perfumes and colognes containing bergamot oil, derived from furocoumarin-loaded oranges.

Who’s Most Likely To Be Affected by Citrus Burn?

Generally speaking, as with any sun-related issue, fair-skinned individuals and those with a history of sun sensitivity are at a higher risk for developing phytophotodermatitis. People with darker skin tones don't usually exhibit such reactivity. Those working in the hospitality industry, such as chefs and bartenders, who handle food regularly, may have higher exposure to furocoumarin-rich foods, especially when serving on patios or at poolside bars. Nature enthusiasts like hikers and bikers could also be more vulnerable due to exposure to wild plants that contain furocoumarins.

Identifying a Margarita Burn

Margarita burns (and lime juice burns in general) can be deceptive, often masquerading as other skin rashes incited by phototoxic exposure. They can emerge on hands, lips, or faces, often presenting in odd patterns like streaks, splotches, or even handprints. The indicators may not surface immediately after sun exposure. Typically, about 24 to 48 hours later, the skin may start to feel tingly, tender, and may begin to redden. In a few more days, painful blisters could develop.

Treating Margarita Burn

Addressing a margarita burn depends on the severity of the symptoms. Here are some recommended steps to follow:

  • Maintain the cleanliness of the affected area and use cold, wet compresses for pain relief.
  • Apply a topical antibiotic cream and bandage the affected area, making sure it's kept out of direct sunlight.
  • Refrain from popping the blisters.

It’s also crucial to seek professional medical advice if the blisters are widespread, appear on your hands or face, or if they hinder your ability to use your hands.

Reducing Alcohol Consumption To Prevent Margarita Burn

In the context of preventing margarita burns, reducing alcohol consumption, or even opting for abstinence, could make a significant difference. Cocktails like margaritas often use fresh limes, and the juice splattered on your skin during the preparation can set the stage for phytophotodermatitis, especially when combined with sun exposure. 

Therefore, by reducing the frequency of cocktail consumption, we inherently lower the chance of lime juice coming in contact with our skin, minimizing the risk of a margarita burn. Additionally, being less intoxicated leads to a more mindful handling of citrus fruits, thus contributing to prevention.

Final Thoughts

As always, prevention reigns supreme. If you're handling food or ingredients rich in furocoumarins, make sure to wash your hands and arms thoroughly with soap and water afterward. If venturing outdoors, wear protective clothing like long pants to protect your skin from contact with wild flora containing furocoumarins.

The joys of summer and a love of citrus-infused cocktails shouldn't lead us to a painful bout of “margarita burn” By understanding the risks and adopting some simple preventative measures, we can continue to enjoy the sun without fear of unexpected dermatological surprises. Remember, prevention is always better than cure, especially when it comes to caring for our skin under the summer sun!

It’s a serene and picturesque summer day. You're comfortably lounging on the patio, savoring a chilled margarita in the sun's warm embrace. Your friend is slicing up limes and squeezing their tangy juice into your cocktail. You enjoy your drink and soak up as much sun as you can before heading back inside. A few days later, however, you're contending with a mysterious, painful sunburn. This isn’t just any sunburn — it’s the infamous “margarita burn.” Also referred to as lime burn or citrus burn, this condition tends to be triggered by eating citrus in the sun.

Demystifying the Margarita Burn

details womans sunburn skin from beach sun

Though the term “margarita burn” may sound playful, the reality is far from it. Rather than a true “burn,” it’s actually more of a margarita rash or margarita dermatitis. The formal name for this condition is phytophotodermatitis, an intense form of sunburn that can be incredibly painful. To break down the term, “phyto” stands for plant, “photo” signifies light or sun, and “dermatitis” points to a skin rash. It's a severe skin reaction to the sun after photosensitising chemicals (furanocoumarins), found in plant sap and fruits, make contact with the body. Phytophotodermatitis looks like blisters that can be confused with sun poisoning or a common rash.

Furocoumarins can increase the skin's sensitivity to the sun, escalating the effects of a sunburn. Interestingly, a variant of phytophotodermatitis, dubbed “berloque dermatitis,” was common in the 1920s among people who wore perfumes and colognes containing bergamot oil, derived from furocoumarin-loaded oranges.

Who’s Most Likely To Be Affected by Citrus Burn?

Generally speaking, as with any sun-related issue, fair-skinned individuals and those with a history of sun sensitivity are at a higher risk for developing phytophotodermatitis. People with darker skin tones don't usually exhibit such reactivity. Those working in the hospitality industry, such as chefs and bartenders, who handle food regularly, may have higher exposure to furocoumarin-rich foods, especially when serving on patios or at poolside bars. Nature enthusiasts like hikers and bikers could also be more vulnerable due to exposure to wild plants that contain furocoumarins.

Identifying a Margarita Burn

Margarita burns (and lime juice burns in general) can be deceptive, often masquerading as other skin rashes incited by phototoxic exposure. They can emerge on hands, lips, or faces, often presenting in odd patterns like streaks, splotches, or even handprints. The indicators may not surface immediately after sun exposure. Typically, about 24 to 48 hours later, the skin may start to feel tingly, tender, and may begin to redden. In a few more days, painful blisters could develop.

Treating Margarita Burn

Addressing a margarita burn depends on the severity of the symptoms. Here are some recommended steps to follow:

  • Maintain the cleanliness of the affected area and use cold, wet compresses for pain relief.
  • Apply a topical antibiotic cream and bandage the affected area, making sure it's kept out of direct sunlight.
  • Refrain from popping the blisters.

It’s also crucial to seek professional medical advice if the blisters are widespread, appear on your hands or face, or if they hinder your ability to use your hands.

Reducing Alcohol Consumption To Prevent Margarita Burn

In the context of preventing margarita burns, reducing alcohol consumption, or even opting for abstinence, could make a significant difference. Cocktails like margaritas often use fresh limes, and the juice splattered on your skin during the preparation can set the stage for phytophotodermatitis, especially when combined with sun exposure. 

Therefore, by reducing the frequency of cocktail consumption, we inherently lower the chance of lime juice coming in contact with our skin, minimizing the risk of a margarita burn. Additionally, being less intoxicated leads to a more mindful handling of citrus fruits, thus contributing to prevention.

Final Thoughts

As always, prevention reigns supreme. If you're handling food or ingredients rich in furocoumarins, make sure to wash your hands and arms thoroughly with soap and water afterward. If venturing outdoors, wear protective clothing like long pants to protect your skin from contact with wild flora containing furocoumarins.

The joys of summer and a love of citrus-infused cocktails shouldn't lead us to a painful bout of “margarita burn” By understanding the risks and adopting some simple preventative measures, we can continue to enjoy the sun without fear of unexpected dermatological surprises. Remember, prevention is always better than cure, especially when it comes to caring for our skin under the summer sun!

Take Charge of Your Well-Being With Reframe!

Although it isn’t a treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the Reframe app can help you cut back on drinking gradually, with the science-backed knowledge to empower you 100% of the way. Our proven program has helped millions of people around the world drink less and live more. And we want to help you get there, too!

The Reframe app equips you with the knowledge and skills you need to not only survive drinking less, but to thrive while you navigate the journey. Our daily research-backed readings teach you the neuroscience of alcohol, and our in-app Toolkit provides the resources and activities you need to navigate each challenge.

You’ll meet hundreds of fellow Reframers in our 24/7 Forum chat and daily Zoom check-in meetings. Receive encouragement from people worldwide who know exactly what you’re going through! You’ll also have the opportunity to connect with our licensed Reframe coaches for more personalized guidance.

Plus, we’re always introducing new features to optimize your in-app experience. We recently launched our in-app chatbot, Melody, powered by the world’s most powerful AI technology. Melody is here to help as you adjust to a life with less (or no) alcohol.

And that’s not all! Every month, we launch fun challenges, like Dry/Damp January, Mental Health May, and Outdoorsy June. You won’t want to miss out on the chance to participate alongside fellow Reframers (or solo if that’s more your thing!).

The Reframe app is free for 7 days, so you don’t have anything to lose by trying it. Are you ready to feel empowered and discover life beyond alcohol? Then download our app through the App Store or Google Play today!

Call to action to download reframe app for ios usersCall to action to download reframe app for android users
Reframe has helped over 2 millions people to build healthier drinking habits globally
Take The Quiz
Our Editorial Standards
At Reframe, we do science, not stigma. We base our articles on the latest peer-reviewed research in psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral science. We follow the Reframe Content Creation Guidelines, to ensure that we share accurate and actionable information with our readers. This aids them in making informed decisions on their wellness journey.
Learn more
Updated Regularly
Our articles undergo frequent updates to present the newest scientific research and changes in expert consensus in an easily understandable and implementable manner.
Table of Contents
Call to action for signing up reframe app
Relevant Articles
Ready to meet the BEST version of yourself?
Start Your Custom Plan
Call to action to download reframe app for ios usersCall to action to download reframe app for android users
review
23,559
App Store Reviews
mobile
3,120,987
App Downloads
a bottle and a glass
102,332,239
Drinks Eliminated / Year

Scan the QR code to get started!

Reframe supports you in reducing alcohol consumption and enhancing your well-being.

Ready To Meet the Best Version of Yourself?
3,120,987 Downloads
23,559 Reviews
102,332,239 Drinks eliminated each year
Try Reframe for 7 Days Free! Scan to download the App