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Drinking Habits

Why Does My Face Turn Red When I Drink Alcohol? (And How To Prevent Red Face When Drinking)

Published:
June 11, 2023
·
9 min read
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Written by
Reframe Content Team
A team of researchers and psychologists who specialize in behavioral health and neuroscience. This group collaborates to produce insightful and evidence-based content.
June 11, 2023
·
9 min read
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Certified recovery coach specialized in helping everyone redefine their relationship with alcohol. His approach in coaching focuses on habit formation and addressing the stress in our lives.
June 11, 2023
·
9 min read
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Recognized by Fortune and Fast Company as a top innovator shaping the future of health and known for his pivotal role in helping individuals change their relationship with alcohol.
June 11, 2023
·
9 min read
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Reframe Content Team
June 11, 2023
·
9 min read

If you’ve ever had the experience of looking in the mirror and noticing your face turning red after a few drinks, you’re not alone. First off, don't panic — you're not turning into a human tomato. There’s actually a lot going on internally that’s important to comprehend so we can effectively change our drinking habits. But why does my face turn red when I drink? And are there any tricks to prevent red face when drinking? What’s with that “alcohol flushed face,” anyway — that embarrassing sunburn? If you find yourself with red face, alcohol may be the main reason why it is induced. Let’s dive into the details of alcohol-induced facial redness, a common condition affectionately known as the “alcohol flush." 

Why Do We Blush?

Before we delve into the world of alcohol-induced facial redness, let's talk about blushing. When we blush, it's because our blood vessels are expanding — a process known as vasodilation. This can happen for a variety of reasons, including emotional responses like embarrassment, physical exertion, or in response to certain foods, medicines, or — you guessed it — alcohol.

Imagine the body as a city and the blood vessels as the network of roads. Naturally, we want traffic to flow smoothly, right? That's where vasodilation comes in — it's like adding extra lanes to the highway to keep the traffic (blood) moving freely in order to deliver nutrients more efficiently.

This whole process is controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Certain chemicals, such as nitric oxide, have the power to relax the muscles in the walls of our blood vessels. This relaxation causes the vessels to widen and allows more blood to flow through.

This comes in handy in various situations. For instance, if you're running a marathon — or just chasing your runaway dog — your muscles need extra oxygen. Thanks to vasodilation, they get just that. Vasodilation also plays a role when we're sick or injured. It boosts the blood flow to the affected area, delivering an array of healing cells. That's why when we get a cut or a sprain, it becomes red and warm due to our blood vessels opening up the roads for the body's healing mechanisms. Flushing with alcohol, therefore, also comes from vasodilation.

So, Why Does My Face Turn Red When I Drink?

Why do I turn red when I drink? A red face from alcohol actually has a scientific explanation. Our bodies break down alcohol in a two-step process. First, an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase — ADH — transforms the alcohol into a substance called acetaldehyde. Then, another enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 — ALDH2 — turns the acetaldehyde into acetate, a less toxic substance. 

But here's the thing: not everyone's ALDH2 enzyme works at the same pace. In some people, particularly those of East Asian descent, a genetic variant causes the ALDH2 enzyme to work less efficiently, leading to an accumulation of acetaldehyde in the bloodstream. Acetaldehyde is a  vasodilator, meaning it causes blood vessels to expand and results in that familiar flushed face. This alcohol vasodilator is what explains the alcohol red face.

diagram about alcohol metabolism

The Risks of Turning Red

A word of caution: several studies have linked the ALDH2 deficiency to an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Acetaldehyde is far more toxic than alcohol itself and is able to damage DNA and proteins, which can lead to mutations and the development of cancer, particularly in the esophagus and liver. Even moderate drinking can lead to a buildup, especially in people who lack sufficient quantities of the enzyme responsible for breaking it down.

Beyond its role as a carcinogen, acetaldehyde is also responsible for many of the negative side effects associated with hangovers. Nausea, vomiting, headache, rapid heartbeat — these unpleasant symptoms can all be traced back to the acetaldehyde coursing through your bloodstream. 

Facial flushing can be a sign of alcohol intolerance, similar to lactose intolerance. This means your body has trouble processing alcohol, which can exacerbate the unpleasant symptoms associated with acetaldehyde buildup.

There's yet another thing to know about acetaldehyde: it can create so-called "acetaldehyde adducts" that form when acetaldehyde reacts with other substances in the body, such as neurotransmitters. This process can interfere with brain function and is thought to contribute to some of the behavioral effects of alcohol, including its addictive potential.

How To Prevent Red Face When Drinking

So is it all bad news? Not necessarily. One recent study suggests that folks who experience alcohol flush might actually have a lower risk of becoming alcohol-dependent. That's because the unpleasant symptoms can act as a natural deterrent, discouraging heavy drinking.

So, if you're looking to quit or cut back on alcohol, the reality of alcohol flushing might end up working as a helpful motivation. But let's be clear: the goal isn't to avoid the flush so you can drink more — it's about listening to your body and making healthier choices. If your face turns red after a drink or two, that might be your body’s way of telling you to take it easy.

If you’re thinking of reducing your alcohol consumption — as well as wondering how to prevent red face when drinking — here are a few tips to get started:

  • Mindful drinking. Try to pay attention to how much you're drinking and pace yourself. Consider sipping on a glass of water between alcoholic drinks.
  • Low-alcohol options. Opt for drinks with a lower alcohol content. That could mean choosing light beer, a wine spritzer, or a mocktail.
  • Support. If you're finding it hard to cut back, don't hesitate to seek help. There are countless support groups, online resources, and healthcare professionals who can provide guidance.

Remember, it's okay to ask for help and it's okay to take things slow. Everyone’s journey is unique, and what matters is that you’re making an effort to be mindful and make healthier choices.

In the end, we might not be able to change our genes or how our bodies react to alcohol, but we can control our drinking habits. The first step to saying goodbye to your red-cheeked reflection starts with saying hello to a healthier lifestyle!

If you’ve ever had the experience of looking in the mirror and noticing your face turning red after a few drinks, you’re not alone. First off, don't panic — you're not turning into a human tomato. There’s actually a lot going on internally that’s important to comprehend so we can effectively change our drinking habits. But why does my face turn red when I drink? And are there any tricks to prevent red face when drinking? What’s with that “alcohol flushed face,” anyway — that embarrassing sunburn? If you find yourself with red face, alcohol may be the main reason why it is induced. Let’s dive into the details of alcohol-induced facial redness, a common condition affectionately known as the “alcohol flush." 

Why Do We Blush?

Before we delve into the world of alcohol-induced facial redness, let's talk about blushing. When we blush, it's because our blood vessels are expanding — a process known as vasodilation. This can happen for a variety of reasons, including emotional responses like embarrassment, physical exertion, or in response to certain foods, medicines, or — you guessed it — alcohol.

Imagine the body as a city and the blood vessels as the network of roads. Naturally, we want traffic to flow smoothly, right? That's where vasodilation comes in — it's like adding extra lanes to the highway to keep the traffic (blood) moving freely in order to deliver nutrients more efficiently.

This whole process is controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Certain chemicals, such as nitric oxide, have the power to relax the muscles in the walls of our blood vessels. This relaxation causes the vessels to widen and allows more blood to flow through.

This comes in handy in various situations. For instance, if you're running a marathon — or just chasing your runaway dog — your muscles need extra oxygen. Thanks to vasodilation, they get just that. Vasodilation also plays a role when we're sick or injured. It boosts the blood flow to the affected area, delivering an array of healing cells. That's why when we get a cut or a sprain, it becomes red and warm due to our blood vessels opening up the roads for the body's healing mechanisms. Flushing with alcohol, therefore, also comes from vasodilation.

So, Why Does My Face Turn Red When I Drink?

Why do I turn red when I drink? A red face from alcohol actually has a scientific explanation. Our bodies break down alcohol in a two-step process. First, an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase — ADH — transforms the alcohol into a substance called acetaldehyde. Then, another enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 — ALDH2 — turns the acetaldehyde into acetate, a less toxic substance. 

But here's the thing: not everyone's ALDH2 enzyme works at the same pace. In some people, particularly those of East Asian descent, a genetic variant causes the ALDH2 enzyme to work less efficiently, leading to an accumulation of acetaldehyde in the bloodstream. Acetaldehyde is a  vasodilator, meaning it causes blood vessels to expand and results in that familiar flushed face. This alcohol vasodilator is what explains the alcohol red face.

diagram about alcohol metabolism

The Risks of Turning Red

A word of caution: several studies have linked the ALDH2 deficiency to an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Acetaldehyde is far more toxic than alcohol itself and is able to damage DNA and proteins, which can lead to mutations and the development of cancer, particularly in the esophagus and liver. Even moderate drinking can lead to a buildup, especially in people who lack sufficient quantities of the enzyme responsible for breaking it down.

Beyond its role as a carcinogen, acetaldehyde is also responsible for many of the negative side effects associated with hangovers. Nausea, vomiting, headache, rapid heartbeat — these unpleasant symptoms can all be traced back to the acetaldehyde coursing through your bloodstream. 

Facial flushing can be a sign of alcohol intolerance, similar to lactose intolerance. This means your body has trouble processing alcohol, which can exacerbate the unpleasant symptoms associated with acetaldehyde buildup.

There's yet another thing to know about acetaldehyde: it can create so-called "acetaldehyde adducts" that form when acetaldehyde reacts with other substances in the body, such as neurotransmitters. This process can interfere with brain function and is thought to contribute to some of the behavioral effects of alcohol, including its addictive potential.

How To Prevent Red Face When Drinking

So is it all bad news? Not necessarily. One recent study suggests that folks who experience alcohol flush might actually have a lower risk of becoming alcohol-dependent. That's because the unpleasant symptoms can act as a natural deterrent, discouraging heavy drinking.

So, if you're looking to quit or cut back on alcohol, the reality of alcohol flushing might end up working as a helpful motivation. But let's be clear: the goal isn't to avoid the flush so you can drink more — it's about listening to your body and making healthier choices. If your face turns red after a drink or two, that might be your body’s way of telling you to take it easy.

If you’re thinking of reducing your alcohol consumption — as well as wondering how to prevent red face when drinking — here are a few tips to get started:

  • Mindful drinking. Try to pay attention to how much you're drinking and pace yourself. Consider sipping on a glass of water between alcoholic drinks.
  • Low-alcohol options. Opt for drinks with a lower alcohol content. That could mean choosing light beer, a wine spritzer, or a mocktail.
  • Support. If you're finding it hard to cut back, don't hesitate to seek help. There are countless support groups, online resources, and healthcare professionals who can provide guidance.

Remember, it's okay to ask for help and it's okay to take things slow. Everyone’s journey is unique, and what matters is that you’re making an effort to be mindful and make healthier choices.

In the end, we might not be able to change our genes or how our bodies react to alcohol, but we can control our drinking habits. The first step to saying goodbye to your red-cheeked reflection starts with saying hello to a healthier lifestyle!

Kickstart Your Well-Being Journey With Reframe!

Although it isn’t a treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the Reframe app can help you cut back on drinking gradually, with the science-backed knowledge to empower you 100% of the way. Our proven program has helped millions of people around the world drink less and live more. And we want to help you get there, too!

The Reframe app equips you with the knowledge and skills you need to not only survive drinking less, but to thrive while you navigate the journey. Our daily research-backed readings teach you the neuroscience of alcohol, and our in-app Toolkit provides the resources and activities you need to navigate each challenge.

You’ll meet hundreds of fellow Reframers in our 24/7 Forum chat and daily Zoom check-in meetings. Receive encouragement from people worldwide who know exactly what you’re going through! You’ll also have the opportunity to connect with our licensed Reframe coaches for more personalized guidance.

Plus, we’re always introducing new features to optimize your in-app experience. We recently launched our in-app chatbot, Melody, powered by the world’s most powerful AI technology. Melody is here to help as you adjust to a life with less (or no) alcohol. 

And that’s not all! Every month, we launch fun challenges, like Dry/Damp January, Mental Health May, and Outdoorsy June. You won’t want to miss out on the chance to participate alongside fellow Reframers (or solo if that’s more your thing!).

The Reframe app is free for 7 days, so you don’t have anything to lose by trying it. Are you ready to feel empowered and discover life beyond alcohol? Then download our app through the App Store or Google Play today! 

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