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Alcohol and Mental Health

Why Does Alcohol Make You Dizzy?

Published:
February 14, 2024
·
18 min read
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Written by
Reframe Content Team
A team of researchers and psychologists who specialize in behavioral health and neuroscience. This group collaborates to produce insightful and evidence-based content.
February 14, 2024
·
18 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Certified recovery coach specialized in helping everyone redefine their relationship with alcohol. His approach in coaching focuses on habit formation and addressing the stress in our lives.
February 14, 2024
·
18 min read
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Recognized by Fortune and Fast Company as a top innovator shaping the future of health and known for his pivotal role in helping individuals change their relationship with alcohol.
February 14, 2024
·
18 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Reframe Content Team
February 14, 2024
·
18 min read

Have you ever been at a party, had a few too many drinks, and suddenly felt the world start spinning around you? It's probably not the room — it's the alcohol! That spinning sensation is a legitimate physical response and a common symptom after drinking a bit too much, and it can also happen after you lie down (hello, bed spins!). But why does alcohol make you dizzy? And how can we get rid of dizziness after drinking? Let's explore the science to find the answers.

Into the Inner Ear

The inner ear acts as the body's level, ensuring we can stand upright and know which way is up. It houses the so-called vestibular system — a fluid-filled labyrinth of canals and chambers lined with thousands of tiny hair cells that detect head movements and send signals to the brain. When everything functions correctly, we feel balanced and stable: the hair cells detect the slightest changes in our head's position and movement, send this information as electrical signals to our brain, and help us keep our equilibrium.

However, alcohol interferes with this system by diluting the fluid in the inner ear. As this fluid becomes less dense, the motion-detecting hairs within the ear become more sensitive. The result? The signals from the inner ear to the brain become slower and less precise. The brain receives a confusing message, and we feel like we’re on a merry-go-round as our sense of balance is thrown off.

It's worth noting that this effect is temporary. As alcohol levels drop, the fluid in the inner ear returns to its normal state, and balance is typically restored.

After a night of drinking, however, we might wake up and still feel the world spinning a bit — a sensation known as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Tiny calcium particles in the inner ear can become dislodged due to alcohol's influence, leading to short episodes of dizziness when we move our head in certain positions.

Moreover, the disorienting sensation isn’t just about feeling dizzy for a while — it can have real consequences. This imbalance can lead to stumbles and falls, putting us at risk of injury, especially if we find ourselves in unfamiliar environments.

Brain Blunders and the Spins

In addition to disrupting the balance mechanism in the inner ear, alcohol directly affects the brain, impacting the cerebellum — the region responsible for balance and coordination. While the cerebellum doesn't initiate movement, it's instrumental in making our motions smooth and coordinated. Imagine reaching for a glass of water: the cerebellum ensures our hands move fluidly, without overshooting or missing the target. Likewise, it helps us walk without veering off course and adjust our posture to avoid tripping or falling.

Alcohol disrupts the cerebellum's functioning, leading to poor coordination, unsteady movements, and — you guessed it! — dizziness. Here’s what happens in more detail:

  • Impaired motor skills. Movements requiring finesse, such as picking up a glass or tying our shoes, become more challenging.
  • Unsteady gait. Our walk might become more unsteady or staggering, increasing the risk of stumbling or falling.
  • Dizziness. As the cerebellum struggles to process information accurately, we may feel disoriented or dizzy. It's not just the world around us that seems unstable — our connection to and understanding of our own body in space is off-kilter.

Blood Pressure Glitches

Another reason alcohol might give us the spins? Blood pressure fluctuations. 

Blood pressure measures the force of blood against the walls of our arteries as our heart pumps it around the body. It's represented by two numbers: systolic (the higher number, representing the force of our heartbeat) and diastolic (the lower number, representing the force when our heart rests between beats).

Alcohol is a depressant that slows the nervous system and causes blood vessels to expand, leading to decreased blood pressure. When blood pressure drops suddenly, it can lead to lightheadedness and dizziness, especially when first standing up from a seated or lying position.

When our blood pressure drops due to alcohol, a few things can happen:

  • Reduced blood flow to the brain. A sudden dip in blood pressure can momentarily reduce the supply of oxygen-rich blood to the brain, leading to dizziness or lightheadedness.
  • Orthostatic hypotension. A fancy term that simply means we might feel dizzy when we stand up too quickly. Alcohol-induced blood pressure changes can exaggerate this phenomenon, making us feel like we’re on an elevator ride when we’re just getting out of a chair. This is also why sometimes we might get dizzy after laying down.
  • Increased fall risk. With dizziness comes a heightened risk of tripping, stumbling, or falling, especially if we’re moving quickly or navigating tricky terrains.

Finding Equilibrium: Don’t Let the Spins Get the Best of You

Awareness is pivotal. If you choose to consume alcohol, it's essential to know its potential effects on your blood pressure. Here are a couple of pointers:

  1. Mind your movements. If you’ve had a drink, take your time when standing up. Gradual movements can help your body adjust and reduce dizziness.

  2. Stay informed. If you're on blood pressure medication or have a history of heart conditions, it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional about alcohol's potential impacts on your body.

Dehydration Dilemmas

Alcohol has a tricky relationship with our body's hydration levels, and it can lead to a parched feeling and dehydration-related dizziness. Before we tackle alcohol’s role, though, let’s review what dehydration means. 

Dehydration occurs when the body loses more fluids than it takes in — an imbalance that leaves the body without enough water and other fluids to function correctly. Symptoms can range from mild thirst and dry skin to severe complications.

Alcohol acts as a diuretic: it promotes diuresis, the increased production of urine. Sounds harmless, right? But when we’re constantly running to the restroom after a few drinks, we’re rapidly losing fluids, making it hard for the body to keep up with its hydration needs.

When dehydration intensifies, a domino effect follows, leading to dizziness:

  • Reduced blood volume. As we lose fluids, the volume of our blood decreases. This means our heart has to work harder at pumping the lower supply to ensure every part of the body gets the oxygen and nutrients it needs.
  • Drop in blood pressure. Reduced blood volume can lead to lowered blood pressure, causing dizziness.
  • Reduced oxygen flow to the brain. With the heart working overtime and a dip in blood pressure, the brain might not get its regular, consistent flow of oxygen-rich blood, leading to light-headedness or dizziness.

Cognitive Misfires

While not dizziness in the traditional sense, alcohol impairs our cognitive abilities. This cognitive impairment can lead to disorientation, which can feel like dizziness. Booze clouds our judgment, slows our reaction time, and impacts our decision-making abilities — all of which can make us feel unsteady on our feet.

Understanding the Causes of Dizziness from Alcohol Consumption

Why Does Everyone React Differently?

Just as every person is unique, so is our response to alcohol. Several factors can influence how dizzy we get:

  • Tolerance. The more frequently we drink, the more our body gets used to alcohol, reducing dizziness. However, this isn't an excuse to drink more! Higher tolerance can lead to other health problems.
  • Body weight. In general, people who weigh less can feel the effects of booze — including dizziness — more quickly.
  • Hydration and food. Drinking on an empty stomach or when dehydrated can intensify alcohol’s effects. It’s always a good idea to hydrate with water and have a bite to eat before a night out!
  • Genetics. Some people might have a genetic disposition that makes them more sensitive to alcohol's effects.

The Spins Beyond the Bottle

Feeling dizzy after a few drinks is one thing, but what if that spinning sensation lingers or feels more intense than usual? While occasional dizziness from drinking can be explained by the factors we've discussed, it's important to recognize when it might be a red flag for something more serious. 

Dizziness can be a symptom of various conditions unrelated to alcohol:

  • Ear infections or disorders. Conditions like labyrinthitis or Meniere’s disease can interfere with the inner ear, causing dizziness.
  • Migraines. For some people, migraines aren't just debilitating headaches. They can also cause vertigo or dizziness.
  • Medications. Dizziness is a side effect of some drugs. Mixing alcohol with certain medications can amplify this effect or introduce new symptoms.
  • Low blood sugar. Dizziness can be a sign of hypoglycemia, especially in people with diabetes.
  • Anxiety disorders. Conditions such as generalized anxiety or panic disorder can manifest with physical symptoms, including dizziness.

When To Worry: Spotting the Red Flags

If we’re experiencing any of the following in addition to dizziness, it might be time to consult a medical professional:

  • Persistent symptoms. If the dizziness continues long after alcohol has left our system, it could indicate another underlying issue.
  • Severe headache. A sudden, intense headache paired with dizziness can be alarming, and it could even be a sign of a stroke.
  • Chest pain or palpitations. Dizziness accompanied by chest discomfort or irregular heartbeats needs immediate medical attention.
  • Nausea or vomiting. Occasional nausea might be par for the course with heavy drinking, but if it's persistent and coupled with dizziness, it’s concerning.
  • Fainting. If dizziness leads to loss of consciousness — even briefly — it’s important to seek medical advice.
  • Difficulty walking or using arms. Any unexplained coordination issues coupled with dizziness warrant a closer look.
  • Change in hearing or vision. If dizziness is paired with sudden hearing loss or vision changes, it could signal an inner ear problem or other serious conditions.

Dizziness might seem like a fleeting inconvenience, but it's our body's way of waving a red flag. While alcohol-induced dizziness can be temporary and harmless, it's crucial to recognize when it might be hinting at something deeper. Trust your body, listen to its cues, and when in doubt, always seek professional advice. Safety first!

Avoid the Spin: 7 Steps To Stop Spinning After Drinking

If you're on a journey to quit or cut back on alcohol, these steps will show you how to get rid of dizziness after drinking while supporting your overall well-being.

  • Stay hydrated. Alcohol is dehydrating. By drinking water alongside alcoholic beverages, you can help counteract this effect and reduce the chances of dizziness.
  • Eat before you drink. A full stomach can slow the absorption of alcohol, lessening its immediate impacts, including dizziness.
  • Mindful moderation. If you choose to drink, do so in moderation. The less alcohol you consume, the less likely you are to experience dizziness.
  • Get up slowly. If you've been sitting or lying down, stand up slowly to prevent a sudden drop in blood pressure, which can make dizziness worse.
  • Limit drinks with high alcohol content. Opting for beverages with lower alcohol content reduces the overall amount of alcohol you're consuming.
  • Rest and recuperate. If you're feeling dizzy after drinking, it's important to rest and avoid activities that require coordination, such as driving.
  • Seek support. If you're trying to cut back or quit drinking, consider joining a support group or seeking counseling. The journey is more comfortable with a supportive community by your side.

Summing Up

While dizziness might seem like just another side effect of drinking, understanding the science behind it can be empowering, especially for those looking to reduce or quit their alcohol consumption. In addition to learning how to stop spinning when feeling a bit drunk, we can also see alcohol-related dizziness as a sign that maybe it’s time to reexamine our relationship with booze. Knowledge and actionable steps can help us walk our path to wellness with confidence!

Have you ever been at a party, had a few too many drinks, and suddenly felt the world start spinning around you? It's probably not the room — it's the alcohol! That spinning sensation is a legitimate physical response and a common symptom after drinking a bit too much, and it can also happen after you lie down (hello, bed spins!). But why does alcohol make you dizzy? And how can we get rid of dizziness after drinking? Let's explore the science to find the answers.

Into the Inner Ear

The inner ear acts as the body's level, ensuring we can stand upright and know which way is up. It houses the so-called vestibular system — a fluid-filled labyrinth of canals and chambers lined with thousands of tiny hair cells that detect head movements and send signals to the brain. When everything functions correctly, we feel balanced and stable: the hair cells detect the slightest changes in our head's position and movement, send this information as electrical signals to our brain, and help us keep our equilibrium.

However, alcohol interferes with this system by diluting the fluid in the inner ear. As this fluid becomes less dense, the motion-detecting hairs within the ear become more sensitive. The result? The signals from the inner ear to the brain become slower and less precise. The brain receives a confusing message, and we feel like we’re on a merry-go-round as our sense of balance is thrown off.

It's worth noting that this effect is temporary. As alcohol levels drop, the fluid in the inner ear returns to its normal state, and balance is typically restored.

After a night of drinking, however, we might wake up and still feel the world spinning a bit — a sensation known as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Tiny calcium particles in the inner ear can become dislodged due to alcohol's influence, leading to short episodes of dizziness when we move our head in certain positions.

Moreover, the disorienting sensation isn’t just about feeling dizzy for a while — it can have real consequences. This imbalance can lead to stumbles and falls, putting us at risk of injury, especially if we find ourselves in unfamiliar environments.

Brain Blunders and the Spins

In addition to disrupting the balance mechanism in the inner ear, alcohol directly affects the brain, impacting the cerebellum — the region responsible for balance and coordination. While the cerebellum doesn't initiate movement, it's instrumental in making our motions smooth and coordinated. Imagine reaching for a glass of water: the cerebellum ensures our hands move fluidly, without overshooting or missing the target. Likewise, it helps us walk without veering off course and adjust our posture to avoid tripping or falling.

Alcohol disrupts the cerebellum's functioning, leading to poor coordination, unsteady movements, and — you guessed it! — dizziness. Here’s what happens in more detail:

  • Impaired motor skills. Movements requiring finesse, such as picking up a glass or tying our shoes, become more challenging.
  • Unsteady gait. Our walk might become more unsteady or staggering, increasing the risk of stumbling or falling.
  • Dizziness. As the cerebellum struggles to process information accurately, we may feel disoriented or dizzy. It's not just the world around us that seems unstable — our connection to and understanding of our own body in space is off-kilter.

Blood Pressure Glitches

Another reason alcohol might give us the spins? Blood pressure fluctuations. 

Blood pressure measures the force of blood against the walls of our arteries as our heart pumps it around the body. It's represented by two numbers: systolic (the higher number, representing the force of our heartbeat) and diastolic (the lower number, representing the force when our heart rests between beats).

Alcohol is a depressant that slows the nervous system and causes blood vessels to expand, leading to decreased blood pressure. When blood pressure drops suddenly, it can lead to lightheadedness and dizziness, especially when first standing up from a seated or lying position.

When our blood pressure drops due to alcohol, a few things can happen:

  • Reduced blood flow to the brain. A sudden dip in blood pressure can momentarily reduce the supply of oxygen-rich blood to the brain, leading to dizziness or lightheadedness.
  • Orthostatic hypotension. A fancy term that simply means we might feel dizzy when we stand up too quickly. Alcohol-induced blood pressure changes can exaggerate this phenomenon, making us feel like we’re on an elevator ride when we’re just getting out of a chair. This is also why sometimes we might get dizzy after laying down.
  • Increased fall risk. With dizziness comes a heightened risk of tripping, stumbling, or falling, especially if we’re moving quickly or navigating tricky terrains.

Finding Equilibrium: Don’t Let the Spins Get the Best of You

Awareness is pivotal. If you choose to consume alcohol, it's essential to know its potential effects on your blood pressure. Here are a couple of pointers:

  1. Mind your movements. If you’ve had a drink, take your time when standing up. Gradual movements can help your body adjust and reduce dizziness.

  2. Stay informed. If you're on blood pressure medication or have a history of heart conditions, it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional about alcohol's potential impacts on your body.

Dehydration Dilemmas

Alcohol has a tricky relationship with our body's hydration levels, and it can lead to a parched feeling and dehydration-related dizziness. Before we tackle alcohol’s role, though, let’s review what dehydration means. 

Dehydration occurs when the body loses more fluids than it takes in — an imbalance that leaves the body without enough water and other fluids to function correctly. Symptoms can range from mild thirst and dry skin to severe complications.

Alcohol acts as a diuretic: it promotes diuresis, the increased production of urine. Sounds harmless, right? But when we’re constantly running to the restroom after a few drinks, we’re rapidly losing fluids, making it hard for the body to keep up with its hydration needs.

When dehydration intensifies, a domino effect follows, leading to dizziness:

  • Reduced blood volume. As we lose fluids, the volume of our blood decreases. This means our heart has to work harder at pumping the lower supply to ensure every part of the body gets the oxygen and nutrients it needs.
  • Drop in blood pressure. Reduced blood volume can lead to lowered blood pressure, causing dizziness.
  • Reduced oxygen flow to the brain. With the heart working overtime and a dip in blood pressure, the brain might not get its regular, consistent flow of oxygen-rich blood, leading to light-headedness or dizziness.

Cognitive Misfires

While not dizziness in the traditional sense, alcohol impairs our cognitive abilities. This cognitive impairment can lead to disorientation, which can feel like dizziness. Booze clouds our judgment, slows our reaction time, and impacts our decision-making abilities — all of which can make us feel unsteady on our feet.

Understanding the Causes of Dizziness from Alcohol Consumption

Why Does Everyone React Differently?

Just as every person is unique, so is our response to alcohol. Several factors can influence how dizzy we get:

  • Tolerance. The more frequently we drink, the more our body gets used to alcohol, reducing dizziness. However, this isn't an excuse to drink more! Higher tolerance can lead to other health problems.
  • Body weight. In general, people who weigh less can feel the effects of booze — including dizziness — more quickly.
  • Hydration and food. Drinking on an empty stomach or when dehydrated can intensify alcohol’s effects. It’s always a good idea to hydrate with water and have a bite to eat before a night out!
  • Genetics. Some people might have a genetic disposition that makes them more sensitive to alcohol's effects.

The Spins Beyond the Bottle

Feeling dizzy after a few drinks is one thing, but what if that spinning sensation lingers or feels more intense than usual? While occasional dizziness from drinking can be explained by the factors we've discussed, it's important to recognize when it might be a red flag for something more serious. 

Dizziness can be a symptom of various conditions unrelated to alcohol:

  • Ear infections or disorders. Conditions like labyrinthitis or Meniere’s disease can interfere with the inner ear, causing dizziness.
  • Migraines. For some people, migraines aren't just debilitating headaches. They can also cause vertigo or dizziness.
  • Medications. Dizziness is a side effect of some drugs. Mixing alcohol with certain medications can amplify this effect or introduce new symptoms.
  • Low blood sugar. Dizziness can be a sign of hypoglycemia, especially in people with diabetes.
  • Anxiety disorders. Conditions such as generalized anxiety or panic disorder can manifest with physical symptoms, including dizziness.

When To Worry: Spotting the Red Flags

If we’re experiencing any of the following in addition to dizziness, it might be time to consult a medical professional:

  • Persistent symptoms. If the dizziness continues long after alcohol has left our system, it could indicate another underlying issue.
  • Severe headache. A sudden, intense headache paired with dizziness can be alarming, and it could even be a sign of a stroke.
  • Chest pain or palpitations. Dizziness accompanied by chest discomfort or irregular heartbeats needs immediate medical attention.
  • Nausea or vomiting. Occasional nausea might be par for the course with heavy drinking, but if it's persistent and coupled with dizziness, it’s concerning.
  • Fainting. If dizziness leads to loss of consciousness — even briefly — it’s important to seek medical advice.
  • Difficulty walking or using arms. Any unexplained coordination issues coupled with dizziness warrant a closer look.
  • Change in hearing or vision. If dizziness is paired with sudden hearing loss or vision changes, it could signal an inner ear problem or other serious conditions.

Dizziness might seem like a fleeting inconvenience, but it's our body's way of waving a red flag. While alcohol-induced dizziness can be temporary and harmless, it's crucial to recognize when it might be hinting at something deeper. Trust your body, listen to its cues, and when in doubt, always seek professional advice. Safety first!

Avoid the Spin: 7 Steps To Stop Spinning After Drinking

If you're on a journey to quit or cut back on alcohol, these steps will show you how to get rid of dizziness after drinking while supporting your overall well-being.

  • Stay hydrated. Alcohol is dehydrating. By drinking water alongside alcoholic beverages, you can help counteract this effect and reduce the chances of dizziness.
  • Eat before you drink. A full stomach can slow the absorption of alcohol, lessening its immediate impacts, including dizziness.
  • Mindful moderation. If you choose to drink, do so in moderation. The less alcohol you consume, the less likely you are to experience dizziness.
  • Get up slowly. If you've been sitting or lying down, stand up slowly to prevent a sudden drop in blood pressure, which can make dizziness worse.
  • Limit drinks with high alcohol content. Opting for beverages with lower alcohol content reduces the overall amount of alcohol you're consuming.
  • Rest and recuperate. If you're feeling dizzy after drinking, it's important to rest and avoid activities that require coordination, such as driving.
  • Seek support. If you're trying to cut back or quit drinking, consider joining a support group or seeking counseling. The journey is more comfortable with a supportive community by your side.

Summing Up

While dizziness might seem like just another side effect of drinking, understanding the science behind it can be empowering, especially for those looking to reduce or quit their alcohol consumption. In addition to learning how to stop spinning when feeling a bit drunk, we can also see alcohol-related dizziness as a sign that maybe it’s time to reexamine our relationship with booze. Knowledge and actionable steps can help us walk our path to wellness with confidence!

Summary FAQs

1. Why does alcohol make us feel dizzy?

Alcohol impacts various parts of our body, from the inner ear's balance system to the cerebellum's coordination control. It also causes a drop in blood pressure, leads to dehydration, and can interact with medications, all potentially leading to dizziness.

2. How does the inner ear play a role in alcohol-induced dizziness?

The inner ear contains the vestibular system, crucial for maintaining balance. Alcohol can alter the fluid balance in the inner ear, disrupting our sense of equilibrium and causing dizziness.

3. Can alcohol affect our blood pressure?

Yes, moderate to high amounts of alcohol can cause a temporary drop in blood pressure by dilating blood vessels. This sudden drop can result in dizziness, especially when changing positions quickly.

4. Why does drinking alcohol lead to dehydration?

Alcohol acts as a diuretic, increasing urine production. This rapid fluid loss can lead to dehydration, which, in turn, can cause symptoms like dizziness due to reduced blood volume and lowered blood pressure.

5. When should I be concerned about dizziness after drinking?

If dizziness persists long after drinking, is accompanied by severe headaches, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, fainting, or changes in hearing or vision, it's essential to seek medical advice. These could be signs of a more serious underlying issue.

6. Can mixing alcohol with medications heighten dizziness?

Absolutely. Some medications, when combined with alcohol, can amplify dizziness or introduce new symptoms. Always consult with a healthcare professional about potential interactions.

7. What can I do to minimize the risk of dizziness when drinking?

Stay hydrated by pairing each alcoholic drink with a glass of water, pace your drinking, move slowly to avoid sudden drops in blood pressure, and be mindful of potential medication interactions. If in doubt, consult with a healthcare professional.

Ready To Feel Steady on Your Feet and Leave Alcohol Behind? Try Reframe!

Although it isn’t a treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the Reframe app can help you cut back on drinking gradually, with the science-backed knowledge to empower you 100% of the way. Our proven program has helped millions of people around the world drink less and live more. And we want to help you get there, too!

The Reframe app equips you with the knowledge and skills you need to not only survive drinking less, but to thrive while you navigate the journey. Our daily research-backed readings teach you the neuroscience of alcohol, and our in-app Toolkit provides the resources and activities you need to navigate each challenge.

You’ll meet millions of fellow Reframers in our 24/7 Forum chat and daily Zoom check-in meetings. Receive encouragement from people worldwide who know exactly what you’re going through! You’ll also have the opportunity to connect with our licensed Reframe coaches for more personalized guidance.

Plus, we’re always introducing new features to optimize your in-app experience. We recently launched our in-app chatbot, Melody, powered by the world’s most powerful AI technology. Melody is here to help as you adjust to a life with less (or no) alcohol. 

And that’s not all! Every month, we launch fun challenges, like Dry/Damp January, Mental Health May, and Outdoorsy June. You won’t want to miss out on the chance to participate alongside fellow Reframers (or solo if that’s more your thing!).

The Reframe app is free for 7 days, so you don’t have anything to lose by trying it. Are you ready to feel empowered and discover life beyond alcohol? Then download our app through the App Store or Google Play today! 

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