Curious How Mindful Drinking Can Help You Thrive? 🎉🙌
Click Here
A person pouring alcohol into glasses
Drinking Habits

Australia and the Laws Related to Alcohol 

Published:
April 2, 2024
·
19 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Written by
Reframe Content Team
A team of researchers and psychologists who specialize in behavioral health and neuroscience. This group collaborates to produce insightful and evidence-based content.
April 2, 2024
·
19 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Certified recovery coach specialized in helping everyone redefine their relationship with alcohol. His approach in coaching focuses on habit formation and addressing the stress in our lives.
April 2, 2024
·
19 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Recognized by Fortune and Fast Company as a top innovator shaping the future of health and known for his pivotal role in helping individuals change their relationship with alcohol.
April 2, 2024
·
19 min read
Reframe App LogoReframe App Logo
Reframe Content Team
April 2, 2024
·
19 min read

A Guide to Laws on Grog in Australia

  • Australia has alcohol laws quite different from the rest of the world. 
  • Knowing the law can help tourists and citizens alike practice responsible drinking in “The Land Down Under.”
  • Reframe offers a research-backed program to help you learn more about alcohol and how it fits into your life.

Australia is known for its unique wildlife and lush landscapes. From close-ups with cuddly koalas to lounging on pristine beaches, the Land Down Under is a coveted place to be. And if you’re familiar with Australia, then you’ve most likely heard of its active drinking culture.

While there may be some Aussies who live it up at the pubs, there are plenty who drink in moderation. With Australia’s prevalent drinking customs, state and local governments have been implementing stricter regulations, including laws about sobriety checkpoint vehicles known as Booze Buses.

To help us make informed decisions, let’s explore the nitty-gritty of Oz’s alcohol-related laws so we can stay out of trouble and drink responsibly while visiting.

History of Alcohol in Australia

A person pouring alcohol into glasses

In order to understand Australia’s drinking culture and the laws that govern it, let’s explore the early days of alcohol use in Australia. 

While Aboriginal peoples of Australia had long used alcoholic beverages in certain ceremonies, high-proof alcohol wasn’t widely popularized in Australia until 1788 when the first fleet of British ships arrived. They brought along enough rum to satisfy British naval officers for four years, and it quickly became a form of currency. Rum was used to purchase anything and everything in the new colony, from land to prisoners. Over time, spirits came to be an integral aspect of the culture. Settlers and Aboriginal peoples alike began to produce bootleg spirits, and many got sick or died from the crude concoctions. 

As time went on, alcohol consumption continued to increase. Prohibition laws were passed in the early 19th century as the government began to acknowledge the health and economic impacts alcohol was having on its citizens.

These laws produced mixed results. In 1916, several territories enacted laws requiring bars to close by 6 p.m. in an attempt to curb alcohol consumption. This unintentionally induced an excessive drinking culture that some say still persists today. Since bars closed by 6 p.m., workers would head to the pubs and drink as much as they could from clock out to closing — causing what is colloquially known as the “six o’clock swill.” This trend started to die down in the 1960s when entertainment and sports culture took off. 

During the ‘70s in Australia, drinking age laws changed, and the legal drinking age was lowered from 21 to 18. To this day, alcohol remains a large part of Australia’s politics and culture. Public policy throughout the decades has promoted excessive drinking, which researchers say has contributed to today’s boozy workplace culture.

Fortunately, public health officials are increasingly acknowledging alcohol’s harmful effects on health. Today, there are many regulations that seek to control consumption of alcohol.

Laws Related to Alcohol

Now let’s take a look at the variety of laws related to alcohol in Australia. Keep in mind that alcohol-related laws and legal consequences of alcohol use vary from state to state and territory to territory, but these national laws generally apply everywhere.

Drinking Age in Australia

The legal drinking age across all territories in Australia is 18 years old. This topic is widely debated among residents and politicians — previously, some states set the drinking age at 21 or even as high as 26. Officials amended laws in the 19th century to reduce the drinking age, and these laws have remained unchanged since then. 

An 18-year-old Australian citizen is considered a legal adult. Advocates of drinking law changes argued that if an adult is allowed to vote, they should also be allowed to drink. However, a recent increase in alcohol-related driving incidents has sparked debate among Aussies, and many are pushing for an increase in the legal drinking age.

Legal Driving BAC

Blood alcohol content refers to the level of alcohol present in our system. It’s used as a measure to determine how intoxicated we are after drinking. Alcohol impairs our driving abilities by affecting areas of our brain that control coordination, perception, and motor function. There are strict regulations on a driver’s BAC to help reduce alcohol-related accidents.  

Across all territories in Australia, the legal driving BAC level is 0.05%. Specific licenses and occupations require a BAC of 0.00%. This includes those with a provisional driving license, truck drivers, bus drivers, driving instructors, and those previously convicted of driving under the influence. 

Downing “one for the road” was a common behavior until stricter measures were taken to enforce the legal driving BAC limit. In recent years, Booze Buses (mobile breathalyzer stations found at roadside sobriety checkpoints) have been implemented to dissuade drivers from drinking and driving. Driving under the influence remains one of the most commonly committed crimes related to alcohol consumption.

Public Drinking

Public drinking refers to drinking alcohol outside of designated areas, often in places such as parks, roads, and public transport. Specific public drinking laws and no-alcohol zones vary by territory and state. In general, public drinking is not allowed in Australia.

Let’s break down the specific public drinking regulations by territory and state.

  • Western Australia. In this territory, it’s illegal for anyone of any age to drink in public areas. This includes the streets, parks, and beaches. 
  • Australia Capital Territory. This area has permanent alcohol-free zones, including the Civic Square and Phillip neighborhoods of Canberra, public skateparks, bus stations, light rail stops, bus interchanges, or areas that have signs designating them as alcohol-free areas. 
  • Northern Territory. It’s illegal to drink within 2 km of any businesses licensed to sell alcohol in the Northern Territory. Additionally, public drinking is not allowed in the cities of Alice Springs, Katherine, Tennant Creek, and some areas of Darwin. 
  • South Australia. This state has designated dry areas where possession and consumption of alcohol are prohibited. The dry zones include the Time Ball Tower, Semaphore Foreshore, Blair Athol, Peter McKay, Denver Terrace, John Watkins, and Port Canal Reserves.
  • New South Wales. Alcohol-free zones in NSW include public roads and footpaths. The term “alcohol-prohibited areas” refers to non-road spaces and covers public parks and civic spaces. Some areas have time restrictions, typically from 10 p.m. to 10 a.m., although the constraints may not apply on certain holidays. 
  • Victoria. In this state, public drinking is prohibited in the central business district all year round. It’s also banned during certain major holidays and events, including New Year’s Eve, the Melbourne Moomba Festival, the Australian Grand Prix, and the Carlton Italian Festa. The City of Melbourne allows responsible alcohol consumption in public parks and gardens but may enforce certain restrictions during major holidays.
  • Tasmania. Public drinking is banned in certain areas of Tasmania, while others have time restrictions. Franklin Square, Long Beach Reserve, and St. David’s Park are alcohol-free zones. Areas with time restrictions include Hobart Cenotaph, Hobart Regatta Grounds, John Doggett Park, Parliament House Gardens, and public parks.
  • Queensland. Public drinking is not allowed in Queensland. The city has wet areas, which include hotels, bars, restaurants, and certain events with proper alcohol permits.
Alcohol Statistics in Australia

Alcohol Bans 

Aboriginal communities have been disproportionately affected by alcohol consumption since Australia was colonized by the British Royal Navy in 1788. Citing crime and poor social conditions, colonial governments banned alcohol for First Nations people from 1837 until the end of the 1960s. 

When these bans were lifted, there was a surge in excessive alcohol consumption. Once again, increased alcohol-related crime prompted alcohol management plans and bans to be reinstated for Aboriginal communities. Alcohol is widely restricted in areas deemed Aboriginal lands, and in 2007 the Northern Territory government enacted a 15-year outright ban on possession and consumption of alcohol inside lands designated for Aboriginal peoples. This ban was reaffirmed upon its expiration in 2023.

The ethicality and efficacy of alcohol bans continue to be debated; despite the prohibition of alcohol in Aboriginal towns, crime, and other alcohol-related consequences continue to disproportionately affect the communities.

Selling Alcohol

Across Australia, it’s illegal to sell alcohol to minors and those who are already intoxicated. Section 5 of the Liquor Act 2007 defines “intoxication” as when “a person’s speech, balance, coordination, or behaviour is noticeably affected,” and it is “reasonable in the circumstances to believe [these behaviors are] the result of the consumption of liquor.”

Labeling Alcohol

Alcohol labeling laws ensure that we as consumers are informed about the alcohol content in an item and that we are aware of its potential harmful effects. For instance, all alcoholic beverages in Australia must have printed pregnancy warnings, as alcohol poses major risks to fetal health and development.

Across Australia, all alcohol products must clearly display alcohol content and how many standard drinks they contain. There are also restrictions on labeling beverages as low-alcohol, non-intoxicating, and non-alcoholic. These restrictions are based on a beverage’s alcohol by volume (ABV), a measure of the alcohol content.

  • Low-alcohol beverages may not exceed 1.15% ABV.

  • Non-intoxicating beverages may not exceed 0.5% ABV.

  • Non-alcoholic beverages must contain zero alcohol.

These labels ensure that we understand what we are purchasing and how it may affect us. Similar to how misleading food labels like “heart-healthy” Cheerios or “natural” peanut butter can trick us into thinking we’re making a healthy choice, deceptive alcohol packaging and advertisements are not always as straightforward as they seem.

Secondary Supply

“Secondary supply” is the act of providing alcohol to a minor in a private home. Laws vary by state and territory. In some areas, it’s legal only if the providing adult is the minor’s legal parent or guardian. In other areas, it’s legal if a parent or guardian grants permission. 

Studies show that alcohol has particularly negative impacts on developing brains, which generally refers to those under the age of 25. Although secondary supply is generally legal across Australia, it’s important to consider the consequences of alcohol use for young people.

Legal Consequences of Alcohol

Legal consequences of alcohol-related crimes vary depending on the crime and the degree to which the law was broken. There are three major legal consequences for breaking alcohol-related laws.

  1. Fines. We may be subject to fines for breaking any alcohol-related law in Australia. Fines range from $200 for drinking in a public area to up to tens of thousands for supplying alcohol to a minor in areas such as restaurants and bars with liquor licenses.  
  2. Imprisonment. Illegal sale and production of alcohol on a large scale can lead to imprisonment. Driving under the influence is considered a major offense and can result in jail time.
  3. Revocation of licenses. Those driving under the influence can have their license disqualified for up to two years depending on the circumstances. Manufacturers and businesses can have their alcohol license revoked for up to five years depending on the law breached.

Alcohol Statistics in Australia

While laws and legal consequences help reinforce Australia’s many regulations, alcohol continues to have detrimental impacts on the public health and safety. Alcohol-related statistics highlight the extent of these impacts and support the need for continued regulation. It’s advantageous to see what effects alcohol has in order to understand the importance of these alcohol-related laws.

  • Over 1,500 alcohol-induced deaths occur each year in Australia.
  • There are over 157,000 alcohol-related hospitalizations per year in the country.
  • More than 1 in 4 adults exceed the Australian Adult Guideline for alcohol consumption.
  • More than 1 in 5 car fatalities in Australia involved a driver with an illegal BAC level.
  • Over 6% of the burden of disease in Australia is attributable to risky alcohol consumption.

These facts remind us of the severe consequences of irresponsible alcohol consumption. Laws and regulations vary from region to region, but altogether they aim to limit alcohol consumption for our health and safety.

In Conclusion

Alcohol has been ingrained in Australian culture since its days as a colony. A strong drinking culture persists today, but laws and legislation have been put in place to mitigate the negative effects that alcohol has on public health. Breaking these laws leads not only to legal ramifications but also to an increased risk of alcohol-related diseases and accidents. Alcohol laws exist to encourage responsible drinking — if you’re going to drink, be safe and do it legally!


Australia is known for its unique wildlife and lush landscapes. From close-ups with cuddly koalas to lounging on pristine beaches, the Land Down Under is a coveted place to be. And if you’re familiar with Australia, then you’ve most likely heard of its active drinking culture.

While there may be some Aussies who live it up at the pubs, there are plenty who drink in moderation. With Australia’s prevalent drinking customs, state and local governments have been implementing stricter regulations, including laws about sobriety checkpoint vehicles known as Booze Buses.

To help us make informed decisions, let’s explore the nitty-gritty of Oz’s alcohol-related laws so we can stay out of trouble and drink responsibly while visiting.

History of Alcohol in Australia

A person pouring alcohol into glasses

In order to understand Australia’s drinking culture and the laws that govern it, let’s explore the early days of alcohol use in Australia. 

While Aboriginal peoples of Australia had long used alcoholic beverages in certain ceremonies, high-proof alcohol wasn’t widely popularized in Australia until 1788 when the first fleet of British ships arrived. They brought along enough rum to satisfy British naval officers for four years, and it quickly became a form of currency. Rum was used to purchase anything and everything in the new colony, from land to prisoners. Over time, spirits came to be an integral aspect of the culture. Settlers and Aboriginal peoples alike began to produce bootleg spirits, and many got sick or died from the crude concoctions. 

As time went on, alcohol consumption continued to increase. Prohibition laws were passed in the early 19th century as the government began to acknowledge the health and economic impacts alcohol was having on its citizens.

These laws produced mixed results. In 1916, several territories enacted laws requiring bars to close by 6 p.m. in an attempt to curb alcohol consumption. This unintentionally induced an excessive drinking culture that some say still persists today. Since bars closed by 6 p.m., workers would head to the pubs and drink as much as they could from clock out to closing — causing what is colloquially known as the “six o’clock swill.” This trend started to die down in the 1960s when entertainment and sports culture took off. 

During the ‘70s in Australia, drinking age laws changed, and the legal drinking age was lowered from 21 to 18. To this day, alcohol remains a large part of Australia’s politics and culture. Public policy throughout the decades has promoted excessive drinking, which researchers say has contributed to today’s boozy workplace culture.

Fortunately, public health officials are increasingly acknowledging alcohol’s harmful effects on health. Today, there are many regulations that seek to control consumption of alcohol.

Laws Related to Alcohol

Now let’s take a look at the variety of laws related to alcohol in Australia. Keep in mind that alcohol-related laws and legal consequences of alcohol use vary from state to state and territory to territory, but these national laws generally apply everywhere.

Drinking Age in Australia

The legal drinking age across all territories in Australia is 18 years old. This topic is widely debated among residents and politicians — previously, some states set the drinking age at 21 or even as high as 26. Officials amended laws in the 19th century to reduce the drinking age, and these laws have remained unchanged since then. 

An 18-year-old Australian citizen is considered a legal adult. Advocates of drinking law changes argued that if an adult is allowed to vote, they should also be allowed to drink. However, a recent increase in alcohol-related driving incidents has sparked debate among Aussies, and many are pushing for an increase in the legal drinking age.

Legal Driving BAC

Blood alcohol content refers to the level of alcohol present in our system. It’s used as a measure to determine how intoxicated we are after drinking. Alcohol impairs our driving abilities by affecting areas of our brain that control coordination, perception, and motor function. There are strict regulations on a driver’s BAC to help reduce alcohol-related accidents.  

Across all territories in Australia, the legal driving BAC level is 0.05%. Specific licenses and occupations require a BAC of 0.00%. This includes those with a provisional driving license, truck drivers, bus drivers, driving instructors, and those previously convicted of driving under the influence. 

Downing “one for the road” was a common behavior until stricter measures were taken to enforce the legal driving BAC limit. In recent years, Booze Buses (mobile breathalyzer stations found at roadside sobriety checkpoints) have been implemented to dissuade drivers from drinking and driving. Driving under the influence remains one of the most commonly committed crimes related to alcohol consumption.

Public Drinking

Public drinking refers to drinking alcohol outside of designated areas, often in places such as parks, roads, and public transport. Specific public drinking laws and no-alcohol zones vary by territory and state. In general, public drinking is not allowed in Australia.

Let’s break down the specific public drinking regulations by territory and state.

  • Western Australia. In this territory, it’s illegal for anyone of any age to drink in public areas. This includes the streets, parks, and beaches. 
  • Australia Capital Territory. This area has permanent alcohol-free zones, including the Civic Square and Phillip neighborhoods of Canberra, public skateparks, bus stations, light rail stops, bus interchanges, or areas that have signs designating them as alcohol-free areas. 
  • Northern Territory. It’s illegal to drink within 2 km of any businesses licensed to sell alcohol in the Northern Territory. Additionally, public drinking is not allowed in the cities of Alice Springs, Katherine, Tennant Creek, and some areas of Darwin. 
  • South Australia. This state has designated dry areas where possession and consumption of alcohol are prohibited. The dry zones include the Time Ball Tower, Semaphore Foreshore, Blair Athol, Peter McKay, Denver Terrace, John Watkins, and Port Canal Reserves.
  • New South Wales. Alcohol-free zones in NSW include public roads and footpaths. The term “alcohol-prohibited areas” refers to non-road spaces and covers public parks and civic spaces. Some areas have time restrictions, typically from 10 p.m. to 10 a.m., although the constraints may not apply on certain holidays. 
  • Victoria. In this state, public drinking is prohibited in the central business district all year round. It’s also banned during certain major holidays and events, including New Year’s Eve, the Melbourne Moomba Festival, the Australian Grand Prix, and the Carlton Italian Festa. The City of Melbourne allows responsible alcohol consumption in public parks and gardens but may enforce certain restrictions during major holidays.
  • Tasmania. Public drinking is banned in certain areas of Tasmania, while others have time restrictions. Franklin Square, Long Beach Reserve, and St. David’s Park are alcohol-free zones. Areas with time restrictions include Hobart Cenotaph, Hobart Regatta Grounds, John Doggett Park, Parliament House Gardens, and public parks.
  • Queensland. Public drinking is not allowed in Queensland. The city has wet areas, which include hotels, bars, restaurants, and certain events with proper alcohol permits.
Alcohol Statistics in Australia

Alcohol Bans 

Aboriginal communities have been disproportionately affected by alcohol consumption since Australia was colonized by the British Royal Navy in 1788. Citing crime and poor social conditions, colonial governments banned alcohol for First Nations people from 1837 until the end of the 1960s. 

When these bans were lifted, there was a surge in excessive alcohol consumption. Once again, increased alcohol-related crime prompted alcohol management plans and bans to be reinstated for Aboriginal communities. Alcohol is widely restricted in areas deemed Aboriginal lands, and in 2007 the Northern Territory government enacted a 15-year outright ban on possession and consumption of alcohol inside lands designated for Aboriginal peoples. This ban was reaffirmed upon its expiration in 2023.

The ethicality and efficacy of alcohol bans continue to be debated; despite the prohibition of alcohol in Aboriginal towns, crime, and other alcohol-related consequences continue to disproportionately affect the communities.

Selling Alcohol

Across Australia, it’s illegal to sell alcohol to minors and those who are already intoxicated. Section 5 of the Liquor Act 2007 defines “intoxication” as when “a person’s speech, balance, coordination, or behaviour is noticeably affected,” and it is “reasonable in the circumstances to believe [these behaviors are] the result of the consumption of liquor.”

Labeling Alcohol

Alcohol labeling laws ensure that we as consumers are informed about the alcohol content in an item and that we are aware of its potential harmful effects. For instance, all alcoholic beverages in Australia must have printed pregnancy warnings, as alcohol poses major risks to fetal health and development.

Across Australia, all alcohol products must clearly display alcohol content and how many standard drinks they contain. There are also restrictions on labeling beverages as low-alcohol, non-intoxicating, and non-alcoholic. These restrictions are based on a beverage’s alcohol by volume (ABV), a measure of the alcohol content.

  • Low-alcohol beverages may not exceed 1.15% ABV.

  • Non-intoxicating beverages may not exceed 0.5% ABV.

  • Non-alcoholic beverages must contain zero alcohol.

These labels ensure that we understand what we are purchasing and how it may affect us. Similar to how misleading food labels like “heart-healthy” Cheerios or “natural” peanut butter can trick us into thinking we’re making a healthy choice, deceptive alcohol packaging and advertisements are not always as straightforward as they seem.

Secondary Supply

“Secondary supply” is the act of providing alcohol to a minor in a private home. Laws vary by state and territory. In some areas, it’s legal only if the providing adult is the minor’s legal parent or guardian. In other areas, it’s legal if a parent or guardian grants permission. 

Studies show that alcohol has particularly negative impacts on developing brains, which generally refers to those under the age of 25. Although secondary supply is generally legal across Australia, it’s important to consider the consequences of alcohol use for young people.

Legal Consequences of Alcohol

Legal consequences of alcohol-related crimes vary depending on the crime and the degree to which the law was broken. There are three major legal consequences for breaking alcohol-related laws.

  1. Fines. We may be subject to fines for breaking any alcohol-related law in Australia. Fines range from $200 for drinking in a public area to up to tens of thousands for supplying alcohol to a minor in areas such as restaurants and bars with liquor licenses.  
  2. Imprisonment. Illegal sale and production of alcohol on a large scale can lead to imprisonment. Driving under the influence is considered a major offense and can result in jail time.
  3. Revocation of licenses. Those driving under the influence can have their license disqualified for up to two years depending on the circumstances. Manufacturers and businesses can have their alcohol license revoked for up to five years depending on the law breached.

Alcohol Statistics in Australia

While laws and legal consequences help reinforce Australia’s many regulations, alcohol continues to have detrimental impacts on the public health and safety. Alcohol-related statistics highlight the extent of these impacts and support the need for continued regulation. It’s advantageous to see what effects alcohol has in order to understand the importance of these alcohol-related laws.

  • Over 1,500 alcohol-induced deaths occur each year in Australia.
  • There are over 157,000 alcohol-related hospitalizations per year in the country.
  • More than 1 in 4 adults exceed the Australian Adult Guideline for alcohol consumption.
  • More than 1 in 5 car fatalities in Australia involved a driver with an illegal BAC level.
  • Over 6% of the burden of disease in Australia is attributable to risky alcohol consumption.

These facts remind us of the severe consequences of irresponsible alcohol consumption. Laws and regulations vary from region to region, but altogether they aim to limit alcohol consumption for our health and safety.

In Conclusion

Alcohol has been ingrained in Australian culture since its days as a colony. A strong drinking culture persists today, but laws and legislation have been put in place to mitigate the negative effects that alcohol has on public health. Breaking these laws leads not only to legal ramifications but also to an increased risk of alcohol-related diseases and accidents. Alcohol laws exist to encourage responsible drinking — if you’re going to drink, be safe and do it legally!


Summary FAQs

1. What is the legal Australian drinking age?

The legal drinking age in Australia is 18 years old.

2. Can you drink in public in Australia?

Specific regulations vary by state and territory, but in general public drinking is not allowed in Australia.

3. Which crime is often related to alcohol use?

The most common crimes related to alcohol use include underage drinking and driving under the influence.

4. What are the legal consequences of breaking alcohol laws?

Breaking alcohol laws can lead to fines, imprisonment, and revocation of a driver’s license. The specific consequences are determined by the crime committed and the severity of nonadherence. 

5. What are some of the effects of Australia's heavy drinking culture?

Australia has one of the highest rates of alcohol-related deaths in the world

Trying To Practice Responsible Drinking? Check Out Reframe!

Although it isn’t a treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the Reframe app can help you cut back on drinking gradually, with the science-backed knowledge to empower you 100% of the way. Our proven program has helped millions of people around the world drink less and live more. And we want to help you get there, too!

The Reframe app equips you with the knowledge and skills you need to not only survive drinking less, but to thrive while you navigate the journey. Our daily research-backed readings teach you the neuroscience of alcohol, and our in-app Toolkit provides the resources and activities you need to navigate each challenge.

You’ll meet hundreds of fellow Reframers in our 24/7 Forum chat and daily Zoom check-in meetings. Receive encouragement from people worldwide who know exactly what you’re going through! You’ll also have the opportunity to connect with our licensed Reframe coaches for more personalized guidance.

Plus, we’re always introducing new features to optimize your in-app experience. We recently launched our in-app chatbot, Melody, powered by the world’s most powerful AI technology. Melody is here to help as you adjust to a life with less (or no) alcohol. 

And that’s not all! Every month, we launch fun challenges, like Dry/Damp January, Mental Health May, and Outdoorsy June. You won’t want to miss out on the chance to participate alongside fellow Reframers (or solo if that’s more your thing!).

The Reframe app is free for 7 days, so you don’t have anything to lose by trying it. Are you ready to feel empowered and discover life beyond alcohol? Then download our app through the App Store or Google Play today! 

Call to action to download reframe app for ios usersCall to action to download reframe app for android users
Reframe has helped over 2 millions people to build healthier drinking habits globally
Take The Quiz
Our Editorial Standards
At Reframe, we do science, not stigma. We base our articles on the latest peer-reviewed research in psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral science. We follow the Reframe Content Creation Guidelines, to ensure that we share accurate and actionable information with our readers. This aids them in making informed decisions on their wellness journey.
Learn more
Updated Regularly
Our articles undergo frequent updates to present the newest scientific research and changes in expert consensus in an easily understandable and implementable manner.
Table of Contents
Call to action for signing up reframe app
Relevant Articles
Ready to meet the BEST version of yourself?
Start Your Custom Plan
Call to action to download reframe app for ios usersCall to action to download reframe app for android users
review
31,364
5 Star Reviews
mobile
3,250,000+
Downloads (as of 2023)
a bottle and a glass
500,000,000+
Drinks Eliminated

Scan the QR code to get started!

Reframe supports you in reducing alcohol consumption and enhancing your well-being.

Ready To Meet the Best Version of Yourself?
3,250,000+ Downloads (as of 2023)
31,364 Reviews
500,000,000+ Drinks eliminated
Try Reframe for 7 Days Free! Scan to download the App